Posts Tagged ‘Telugu’

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Andhra State was the first linguistic state that came into existence after India’s independence. When Nizam of Hyderabad in 1947 started toying with the idea of becoming an independent nation, Nehru ordered Indian military into Hyderabad state and merged the territory into Republic of India.

Hyderabad state was then made up of Kannada, Marathi and Telugu speaking regions. To decide how Indian states should be constituted, Nehru appointed the States Reorganization Commission. The commission recommended the merger of Telugu speaking Nizam region with the Andhra state, but recommended a waiting period of 5 years before the merger, to allay some of the concerns expressed by a handful of Congress party leaders. However, there was a strong desire among the Telugu people of all regions to unite. When a resolution for merger was placed in the Hyderabad assembly, 2/3rd of the legislators from Nizam ruled Telugu region favoured an immediate merger. Eventually, after a good bit of deliberation, Nehru’s government agreed to constitute all non-Hindi speaking states of India along linguistic lines.

Breaking the national model of linguistic states to allay the political movements started by leaders like KCR would open a pandora’s box for similar movements across several linguistic states of India. This could potentially be a destabilizing force on the nation. Succumbing to the demand for division of Andhra Pradesh will add fuel to the movements for Bodoland out of Assam, Kongu Nadu out of Tamilnadu, Tulu Nadu out of Karnataka, Vidarbha out of Maharashtra, Gorkhaland out of West Bengal.

The announcement made by Home Minister Chidambaram on December 9th 2009 to divide Andhra Pradesh was done in haste. Unlike creation of states like Chattisgarh or Uttarakhand, division of Andhra Pradesh is complex and convoluted.

Capital city Hyderabad is a major source of state revenue. According to a clarification given in the State Assembly in 2008 by the then Finance Minister Rosaiah, 37% of the state’s revenues come from Hyderabad alone. Andhra Pradesh state budget is well over one lakh crore rupees. In a divided state, Hyderabad city would fall in the Nizam Telangana region. As a result, Coastal Andhra and Rayalaseema will claim a stake in Hyderabad’s revenues. They will argue that they too have contributed to the growth of the capital. An amicable solution to this thorny problem is almost impossible.

If Andhra Pradesh state is divided, there will be a bitter battle among Rayalaseema, Coastal Andhra and Uttara Andhra regions to have the state capital in their own regions. Rayalaseema will insist on having Kurnool as the capital, whereas Coastal Andhra will insist on having Vijayawada or Guntur as the capital, while Uttara Andhra will insist on making the port city of Vizag as the capital of the newly minted state. This battle for capital will no doubt turn into an intractable mess and may lead to violent movements for further division of the state into Rayalaseema, Uttara Andhra, and Coastal Andhra.

Hyderabad city has millions of Telugu people that came from all parts of the state. Vitriol used by leaders like KCR, with statements such as “Tongues will be cut if anybody demands UT status for Hyderabad”, or threats of “civil war” or slogans such as “Telangana wale jago, Andhra wale bhago”, or TRS party MP Vijaya Shanthi openly saying, “whoever enters the Telangana region (for campaigning) will be axed” have instilled fear among the populace. Assaults on prominent leaders like Jayaprakash Narayan and IAS officer Vijayanand and many more have caused millions of people from Coastal Andhra and Rayalaseema to question their personal security in a Telangana state.

There are several other intractable issues on the economic front. For example, two of the major power and irrigation projects in the state, Nagarjuna Sagar and Srisailam are situated right on the border of Nizam Telangana and Coastal Andhra. Add to this mix the disputes that will arise over allocation of river waters to the newly formed states. Problems such as these make the division of Andhra Pradesh a non-trivial matter.

It is clear that the Maoists are in favour of dividing the Andhra Pradesh state. In fact, it can be argued that they are the ones who sowed the seeds for the current separatist movement. Years before KCR dreamt of starting the movement for a separate state, the Naxal’s North Telangana Special Zonal Committee (NTSZC) in 1997 has passed a resolution favouring the formation of Telangana state. During this session detailed strategies about how to build the movement for a separate state have been schemed. Not surprisingly, many of these tactics are currently being employed by the separatists. On January 3rd 2011, KCR, while welcoming former Naxal Sambasivudu into his paty’s fold, promised to endorse and implement the Naxal agenda after the formation of Telangana state. A divided Andhra Pradesh state will strengthen the Naxal movement. A smaller weaker Telangana state could potentially turn into another Maoist hotbed like Chattisgarh and plays into Naxals dream of creating a Maoist corridor of Telangana, Bastar (Chattisgarh), South Orissa, Jharkhand and West Bengal. This is a matter of grave national security.

For too long, Congress, BJP, TDP and other smaller parties used the issue of Telangana for their short term political gains. Andhra Pradesh today is reaping the follies of these myopic positions. The time has come for all political parties to put the interests of nation ahead of their political expediencies. The time has come for the central and state governments to unequivocally stand against not only the division of Andhra Pradesh state but also against division of all linguistic states. Our country has more important priorities at this juncture. If our leaders intend to achieve the double-digit GDP growth and if they are serious about competing with other emerging economies like China, the separatist movements such as the one in Andhra Pradesh should have been nipped in the bud, and it is still not too late.

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.visalandhra.org

http://www.facebook.com/visalandhra

http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

Please "Like" our facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/visalandhra

 

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Please watch the very first video presentation of Visalandhra Mahasabha.

As I watched the video, I got goosebumps and I had to fight back tears. The only time this has happened to me in the past was when Ghazal garu sang his famous patriotic telugu song "Oyi Teluguvada" in New Jersey. That audio is also on youtube, but nothing like listening to him singing live.

Ghazal garu, we need your artistic voice by our side in our fight against separatism.

Please watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Lc7RdE5rso
 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Saturday, March 12th, 2011

Visalandhra Mahasabha is formed by us who are dedicated to the cause of unity of Telugu people. We seek to celebrate our glorious history, our ancient language and our rich culture. We feel that it is our sacred duty to preserve the unity of our State.

 

We draw our inspiration from the founders and leaders of Andhra Mahasabha. They were the pioneers who worked for the unity of Telugu people. They planted the seeds of the idea of a linguistic State for the Telugu people in the beginning of the last century itself. They wanted the Telugu people, then scattered across different political units, to come and live together under one administrative entity. As a result of the great sacrifices of the Andhra Mahasabha leaders from the Circar, Ceded, and the Nizam regions, our State came into existence. Our goal is to revive the noble spirit of Andhra Mahasabha. Under the aegis of Visalandhra Mahasabha, we dedicate ourselves to strive for preserving the geographic unity and integrity of our great State that came into existence after a protracted struggle against the British, the Nizam rulers, as well as the Indian government.

 

Visalandhra Mahasabha is firmly opposed to the division of Andhra Pradesh.

 

We are immensely troubled by the separatist agitation that has been raging in our state for the past 10 years. We are of the firm belief that the separatist agitation is built on blatant lies, false propaganda, and agit-prop techniques. They are adopting Fascist methods to silence the voices of unity. They are resorting to verbal abuse, intimidation, and even physical violence. Unfortunately, a credible and sustained campaign against separatist agitation has not been built in the last 10 years. The falsehoods and canards spread by the separatists are not being effectively contested and exposed. All these months and years, the separatist argument went unchallenged.

 

Justice Srikrishna Committee’s (SKC’s) comprehensive and well-researched report rubbished the various false claims made by the separatists. After a year-long rigorous study, the committee dispelled the myths and falsehoods, the separatists have been consistently spreading, about the Nizam region’s backwardness, underdevelopment, and its discrimination and exploitation by Circar and Ceded regions since the formation of the State of Andhra Pradesh.

 

The separatists have lost their argument. Today, their lies stand exposed. But they continue their agitation. Without an argument. Without a basis. And without a reason.

 

Separatists want the people to believe that “if you love the Nizam region, you must demand the division of the State”. That is the conceptual trap that the separatists have successfully laid during the last ten years. Visalandhra Mahasabha feels that love for Nizam region and demand for a separate State are not one and the same. These two need to be decoupled in the minds of the people. Advocates of Unity are not the enemies of Nizam region. On the contrary, it is the separatists, who are, indeed, its enemies. This message needs to be taken to the people. 

 

Visalandhra Mahasabha feels that the immediate task, however, is to bring the findings of SKC report to the attention of the top leadership of various political parties in the Country. It is important to expose the falsehoods spread by the separatists, who sowed the seeds of suspicion, hatred and division, in the minds of Telugu people. Over the next few months, we will conduct a sustained campaign. We will make sure that the argument for United Andhra Pradesh is heard by all the important political and media personalities who will play a key role in deciding the fate of our beloved State.

 

We want you to be part of this noble endeavour. Please ‘Like’ our facebook page and become a ‘Supporter’ of Visalandhra Mahasabha. Do bring in at least ten more people to join our movement for Unity. Give power to the voice of Visalandhra Mahasabha. Help, preserve, the Unity of our State.

 

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Visalandhra-Mahasabha-For-a-United-Andhra-Pradesh/195686113787989

 

Sincerely,

 

* Dr. Parakala Prabhakar (Ph.D., from London School of Economics, Political Economist, and Policy Consultant)

* Challagulla Narasimha Rao (Eminent Political Aanalyst, author of over 30 books, and 500 articles in various news papers and magazines)

* Prof. Atlury Murali (Ph.D., from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, Professor of History, University of Hyderabad)

* Prof. C M K Reddy (DSc(Hon) FRCS(Glas) FRCS(Ire) General & Vascular Surgeon. President, Tamil Nadu Medical Practitioners' Association (TAMPA), All India Telugu Federation (AITF))

* Sunkara Venkateswar Rao (Founder of Bachao Hyderabad organization, Founder of Sri Guru Peetham Spiritual Trust)

* Kumar Chowdhary Yadav (Founder, Samaikyandhra Samithi Party)

* Dr. Syed Faheem (Dentist by profession, started United Andhra Pradesh facebook group that attracted over 30,000 members)

* Nalamotu Chakravarthy (Management Consultant, MBA from Columbia University, General Secretary Andhra Pradesh Non-Resident Indians, author of the book “My Telugu Roots”)

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

February 17th will go down as one of the ignominious days in our state’s history. Jayaprakash Narayan (JP) is one of the most respected leaders, not just in our state, but in the entire nation. He is known for his honesty and integrity. He has given up a comfortable life as an IAS officer with the goal of cleansing our political system. He has fought relentlessly against corruption and for the fundamental rights of citizens.

It is very unfortunate that the legislators that are responsible for making the laws of the land were the chief provocateurs for a physical assault on JP on the premises of Andhra Pradesh State Assembly on February 17th, 2011. To make matters worse, leaders like KTR, who were educated in the West, instead of championing individuals’ fundamental right of expression, were seen inciting their followers to physically assault JP with the use of filthiest possible language.

For too long, we have hoped for our leaders to stand up and fight for us. Unfortunately, they have failed us. Our elected leaders were mute spectators to the events in the Assembly, just like they have been mute spectators for the last ten years. Ours is a country that is home to leaders like Mahatma Gandhi who took on one of the most powerful countries in the world- The British Empire. Our state is home to fearless fighters like Alluri Sitaramaraju. Our great leaders fought against injustice purely based on a conviction that they were right. That courage and conviction is lost among our leadership today.

The demand for a separate state is not just, but is grounded in prejudice. The allegations of discrimination and under development that have been made by separatists for nearly a decade have been thoroughly refuted by the Srikrishna Committee. In a debate, the first person or group to indulge in physical violence is the one who lost the argument. That is what has happened in the case of separatists’ assault on JP. JP has brought out truth much before Srikrishna Committee did. He boldly came out and said that the separatist allegations did not hold water. He bravely went on TV and aired his views with solid documentary evidence to support his position. Truth is a little too much for the separatists to digest.

I have always had reservations about JP and Loksatta’s position that division of the state is neither good nor bad [I am paraphrasing]. I wished he and his party had taken a clear position on the issue of separation. To my greatest disappointment, Loksatta continued to be ambiguous on this issue. However, I have not run into integrationists who hold personal animosity towards JP. However, for separatists- those that agree with them are their friends and those that don’t should be silenced, even if it means assaulting them physically. This is the kind of culture you see in dictatorial and autocratic societies.

There is one cause that is more important than our state and dare I say even our nation, and that is the protection of fundamental rights of individuals. Whether we survive as a free nation or go the tyrannical way of much of the world is dependent on three simple tenets: life, liberty, and property. In the hierarchy of fundamental rights, protection of life is of the highest order. There is not a single justifiable reason to physically attack another person, other than for self-defence, unless such force is authorized by the law of the land. Unprovoked assault on JP is an assault on person’s fundamental right to life. On February 17th, 2011 our society has taken one step back from being a free society and took one step forward towards a tyrannical society.

Some may question, that there are innocent people being physically assaulted everyday in our nation with no recourse to justice. Similarly, isn’t the JP incident just a drop in the bucket? No it is not. JP is a nationally recognized leader. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Congress Party Presdient Sonia Gandhi, and many national figures know JP personally. He is a people’s representative and a member of the legislative assembly. If a man of that stature is attacked physically, where is the guarantee for the life of a common man? Separatists have succeeded in sending an unequivocal message to those that disagree with their agenda. There are no limits to how far separatists are willing to go to stifle the voices of those that disagree with them.

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Here are the links to the TV interviews we have done a few weeks ago. Studio N interview conducted by Ramesh Garu is by far the most comprehensive interview I have done on TV. Of all the TV anchors that interviewed me, Ramesh Garu was the only one that read my book and you will notice the difference in the quality of interview. The program lasted for an hour without any commercial breaks.

 

Studio N Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=642a8qejPGc
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJx7gtt63o
Part3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGlYBumFxBk
Part4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FgCrHXYHLs
Part5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_CjUq4RPLQ
Part6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2y8koKuX6g
Part7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfSG3bVXZrQ
Part8: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSgrLzgrL2M

 

TV9 Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=513Il_2nstM
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxbwZ3da3nc

 

NTV Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkLFis-U6tI
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWWWhDiBJdU
Part3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWR0Y1uArnc

 

ABN Andhra Jyothy:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oeTJ8TyPhM
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqjR1Q-bodg

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

When Sri Krishna Deva Raya took to the Vijayanagara throne in 1509, the empire was in a significantly weakened state. The entire coastal Telugu areas were occupied by Orissa. Similarly, the Kannada and Tamil regions have also raised a flag of revolt. 24 year old Sri Krishna Deva Raya was determined to put things in order. He first invaded Mysore (Srirangapatnam) and suppressed the Kannada revolt. He then marched on coastal Telugu region and drove out the Orissa army from Udayagiri, Kondavidu, Kondapalli, and Rajahmundry. After this Krishna Deva Raya marched on Tamil Coromandel coast and subdued that region as well. At the end of these battles, that lasted six long years, he was able to bring back the entire South India under Vijayanaagaram’s suzerainty.

 

While Sri Krishna Deva Raya was busy consolidating his empire, Bahamani Empire of Deccan (Gulbarga) was going through infighting. Sultan Quli, who came to India from Turkey, raised a flag of revolt against Bahamani. He attacked Devarakonda and ended the Velama kingdom’s rule.

 

Learning of the attack on the Velama kingdom, Sri Krishna Deva Raya rushed with his forces to rescue and camped at Panagal in Nalgonda. In a fierce battle that ensued, Sultan Quli defeated Sri Krishna Deva Raya forcing his retreat from Nalgonda.

 

Encouraged by his victory, Sultan Quli marched on Coastal Telugu districts. Sri Krishna Deva Raya learnt his lesson and moved into Coastal Andhra with a massive army and succeeded in driving out Sultan Quli’s forces. As a result, today’s Nizam region was separated from Telugu land and a tenuous peace reigned between Vijayanagaram and Qutub Shah who started ruling from Golkonda.

 

Sultan Quli’s brother Ibrahim was the assumed heir to the Golkonda throne. Ibrahim got into a dispute with his brother. Vijayanagaram, after the premature death of Sri Krishna Deva Raya, was now under the rule of his son-in-law Aliya Rama. Aliya gave a large estate in Vijayanagaram to Ibrahim and provided protection from his brother. After the demise of Sultan Quli, Ibrahim left Vijayanagaram and went on to become the king of Golkonda.

 

Sadly, in the Talikota battle waged to destroy Vijayanagaram in the name of Jihad, Ibrahim became a mute spectator to the spectacle of his friend Aliya Rama’s head getting chopped off by Nizam Shah of Ahmadnagar. Though there are accounts that he was grief-stricken to witness his friend’s killing, he did not stop it.

 

Ibrahim, after the demise of Vijayanagara Empire, started annexing its Telugu districts. In 1571-72 he captured Rajahmundry, in 1579 he captured Vinukonda, Kondavidu, Kacharlakota, and Khammam.

 

Hyderabad city was not founded at this time. After Ibrahim Quli’s death, his son Mohammed Quli continued consolidating his hold on Vijayanagara Telugu regions. Mohammed occupied Kurnool, Cuddapah, Nandial, Dole, Gandikota, and Nellore.

 

Mohammed Quli Qutub Shah completed the consolidation of the Telugu region under Muslim rule. He founded Hyderabad in 1589. At the time of the city’s founding the entire Telugu country, including the current Nizam, Circar, and Ceded regions, was under Qutub Shahs.

 

Mongolian Emperor Aurangazeb intended to consolidate his hold on South India. He attacked Golkonda and captured it in 1687, thus ending the Qutub Shahi rule. He appointed his representative Nizam to administer the Golkonda kingdom.

 

British entered India in 1600 to conduct trade through the East India Company. Inspired by the stupendous financial success of the East India Company, French entered Indian shores in 1650s through the French East India Company. British and French quickly went beyond their original goal of trade and got involved in regional conflicts between Indian kingdoms. British were the best in the world when it came to using gun powder, followed by the French.

 

Nizam Asaf Jah of Hyderabad declared independence from Delhi in 1720. Asaf Jah died in 1748. His sons got into a fight for the Hyderabad throne. British and French sided with different heirs in that power struggle. Both the British and French had their eyes set on the Coastal Telugu districts for maritime trade and military reasons.

 

French helped Nizam’s third son Salabat to capture Hyderabad throne. In return for their generosity, Salabat assigned Coastal districts to the French. British concerned with the growing French influence, under the leadership of Colonel Clive, marched on the Coastal districts in 1759 and occupied the region. As a result, British were officially at war with the Hyderabad State.

 

Seven years later in 1766, British and the Nizam reached an agreement to end hostilities. In return for keeping the Coastal districts, British agreed to pay nine lakh rupees a year to Nizam. As you can see, though Coastal districts were separated from the rest of the Telugu land, the districts were still contributing to Hyderabad exchequer through the taxes paid to the British, which are in turn being passed on to Nizam.

 

The conflict between the British and French continued in the Indian subcontinent. Nizam once again sided with French and invited 15,000 French soldiers to protect Hyderabad. British marched on Hyderabad and drove out the French soldiers. Nizam was forced to accept British protection through a treaty signed in 1798. As a result, six battalions of British forces were placed in Hyderabad. Nizam was required to pay 24 lakh rupees a year for the maintenance of British troops.

 

Nizam could not pay the British these monies and as a result amassed a significant debt. In 1800 he was forced to cede Bellary and Cuddapah to the British in return for the British military expense.

 

So, it is clear that Hyderabad continued to receive British protection with the taxes paid by the Circar and Ceded districts even after these regions separated from the Hyderabad State.

 

Hyderabad State, in addition to the 8 Telugu districts, had 4 Kannada and 3 Maratha districts. There was an atrocious tax regime under Nizam. Peasants of all these districts paid taxes through their nose to Nizam.

 

Today’s Hyderabad city is a source of revenue for the rest of the State. However, prior to 1956, the situation was quite different. The rural areas of the Hyderabad State financed the expenses required to maintain the capital city.

 

Now, with that background, who can stake a claim for Hyderabad city?

 

Our capital city belongs to the people living in erstwhile Nizam Telangana, Maratha, and Kannada districts- particularly the peasants.

 

It belongs to Hyderabadi Muslims including those that came from Iran, Iraq, Turkey and other places.

 

It belongs to the Marathis, Kannadigas, Marwadis, Rajputs, Gujaratis, Punjabis and many others who have been living in Hyderabad city for many generations.

 

Lastly, it belongs to the people of Circar and Ceded districts. As separatists call them, these people are not “settlers” but are rightful stakeholders of the Hyderabad city. Just like the poor peasants of the Nizam districts, their forefathers have also contributed to the development of Hyderabad city by paying taxes to the Qutub Shahs, the Nizams and the British.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

 

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

Here is the translated article published in Saakshi newspaper that summarizes some of my views on United Andhra Pradesh:

http://www.sakshi.com/main/WeeklyDetails.aspx?Newsid=52750&Categoryid=1&subcatid=18

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Saturday, April 10th, 2010

Separatists have been telling their supporters that other regions have been looting lakhs of government jobs in violation of the Six Point Formula. During a recent interview with Jayaprakash Narayan, one of the caller to the program claimed that 3 lakh government jobs have been stolen from the Nizam region.

 

Before we go into the analysis, allow me to set-up the stage for those who are not up to speed on the Six Point Formula and GO-610.

 

Six Point Formula is the solution proposed by Smt. Indira Gandhi in 1973, in order to end the separatist movement in the Kosta-Seema regions in opposition to the mulki rules. Smt. Gandhi’s solution was accepted by the leaders of all regions. As per this solution, the state was divided into 6 zones. Zone-I has Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, and Visakhapatnam districts. Zone-II has East Godavari, West Godavari, and Krishna districts. Zone-III has Guntur, Prakasam, and Nellore districts. Zone-IV has Chittoor, Cuddapah, Ananthapur, and Kurnool districts. Zone-V has Adilabad, Karimnagar, Warangal, and Khammam districts. Zone-VI has Hyderabad, Rangareddy, Nizamabad, Mahboobnagar, Medak, and Nalgonda districts.

 

In each zone 70% of non-gazetted, and 60% of gazetted posts were reserved for locals. In addition, 80% of class-IV posts were reserved to locals of the district. Certain exceptions were made to Hyderabad city for state level organizations allowing people from all regions to work in these offices.

 

Government Order 610 was issued in 1985 by the TDP government of Sri N.T. Ramarao, to correct the irregularities that have occurred in the implementation of the Six Point Formula.

 

When we examine the violations to the Six Point Formula they should be studied across all the zones for the sake of completeness. For example, if there are violations made in teacher postings, it is not correct to just look at violations in Zone V and Zone VI, but one should look at violations in all the zones.

 

With that background, now let us look at some of the violations that have occurred in government job appointments. I examined this issue by relying on publicly available sources. I chiefly relied on the Second Interim Report of the House Committee on G.O. 610 as well as the information available on the government website go610.ap.gov.in.

 

According to the House Committee report, the total number of employees in the State government and local bodies is 674,665. Of these employees, 583,026 come under the purview of Six Point Formula.

 

Let us look at violations in the Hyderabad City police appointments as well as violations in teacher appointments across the state. I chose these two categories as the data is available at the district level.

 

According to the presidential order on Six Point Formula, the police recruitment for Hyderabad city does not fall under the zonal system. Therefore, people from all regions have been recruited into city police. However, the House Committee recognized Hyderabad as a local zone and applied 80% local rule. As a result, it found that out of 4,722 police constables, 3,344 are non-locals. In the separatists’ lingo these violators are popularly known as the “job looters”.

 

So let us dig a little deeper to see who these looters are.

 

The House Committee report identified these violators by district. When these violations are aggregated by region, 1615 (50%) of the violators came from the Nizam region, 1212 (38%) came from the Kosta region, 395 (12%) of the violators came from the Rayalaseema region. In other words, the highest number of violators came from the Nizam region.

 

Now let us look at another set of violators. These are teacher posting violations that happened across the entire State. The government forcefully repatriated these people to their home districts and here is how the numbers look when aggregated by region.

 

About 2,600 teachers were found in violation of Six Point Formula, across the state. Below table gives the breakdown of these violators by region.

 

GO610_Violators

 

It may be a little confusing to interpret the matrix, so please allow me to paint the picture.

 

In the Nizam Telangana districts, a total 992 teachers, were found in violation of the Six Point Formula and have been repatriated to their home districts. Out of these 992 teachers, 541 violators came from the Nizam region itself. For example, in Nalgonda there were 71 teachers who were non-locals. Of these 71 teachers, 10 came from Warangal, 3 came from Karimnagar, 1 from Mahabubnagar, 1 from Adilabad, 8 from Hyderabad, 1 from Medak, 2 from Nizamabad, 13 from Khammam. The remaining violators came from Kosta and Seema. Overall, of the 992 violators in the Nizam region, 311 came from Kosta and 58 came from Rayalaseema.

 

Similarly there were 1100 violators in Kosta and 825 of them came from the Kosta districts. 110 violators came from the Nizam region and 147 from Rayalaseema.

 

Along the same lines, there were 345 repatriations in the Seema. Out of these, 193 violators came from Rayalaseema itself, while 112 came from Kosta and 27 from the Nizam region.

 

So, who are the worst victims of this nonsensical Six Point Formula, which plays the chief role of further exacerbating the differences among Telugu people? A majority of the victims come from their native regions and these forced repatriations make them feel like they are aliens in their own land.

 

So, what conclusions can we can draw from what we saw so far?

 

Yes, violations to the Six Point Formula have happened. However, these violations have happened across all the regions and a majority of these violators come from their native regions. Number of violations in the Nizam Telangana could possibly be a bit higher than the other two regions of the state. However, the extent of these violations is nowhere close to the mass hysteria that is being created by the separatists over government jobs. As usual, the separatist modus-operandi is to incite people by cherry-picking the violations that occurred in the Nizam Telangana region and conveniently forgetting to mention to their constituents that similar violations have occurred in the other regions too.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

 

===========================================

 

Links to:

GO 610 House Committee Report

Data I extracted from the pdfs on the go610 government web-site

GO 610

Six Point Formula

 

Section 18.1.9 of Girglani report said (scanned copy of the excerpt given below): "In the various representations to the government and in the Press a figure ranging 40,000 to 58,000 of non-locals working in zones V and VI is being given as those who are working in violation of Presidential Order. The statistical part of non-locals and locals has been examined by the Commission and it will be seen that the percentage of non-locals in the zones V and VI is negligible and far below the sealing of 20 percent. Therefore on statistical aspect there is no question of any action or implementation of the G.O." 

 

Girglani_Important_Note

 

 

 

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Monday, March 29th, 2010

Here is my conversation with TV9's Pratyusha. This discussion has occurred after the Pustaka Parichayam program that was broadcast on TV9 this weekend.

 

I am trying to get the video of Pustaka Parichayam program. If it is available on a public site, please pass it on to me as I would like to provide a response to Professor Manohar's allegations.

 

Here is the link to my conversation with Pratyusha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLdjdS8Reh0

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

I would like to present more statistics on the state of Nizam Telangana, Coastal Andhra, and Rayalaseema regions. The data does not include education and irrigation as I’ve already published this data on my web-site at http://www.myteluguroots.com/tables.html.

 

I am not going to provide detailed commentary on the data, as the tables are self-explanatory in nature. 

 

Here is the gist:

 

In the categories of total workers, government hospitals, primary health centers, livestock, factory employment, power consumption, roads, school and degree education Nizam region performs better.

 

In the categories of number of beds in the government hospitals, number of vehicles it falls behind.

 

In the categories of total agriculture output, and poultry Nizam Telangana is comparable to the other regions.

 

Per-capita income is a good gauge to assess the economic well-being of a region. When summarized by region, Kosta per-capita income is Rs. 28,133, Nizam Telangana is Rs. 26,528, and Rayalaseema is Rs. 20,804. When Hyderabad and Rangareddi districts are excluded from Nizam Telangana, per-capita income drops to Rs. 24,168.

 

Based on per-capita income, clearly Nizam Telangana is behind Coastal Andhra and ahead of Rayalaseema. However, this difference is not enough to justify the kind of wild and inflammatory exaggerations being made by the separatists to further their agenda of hate. The backwardness of the Nizam Telangana region can be partly attributed to the feudal rule under Nizam. If one were to look at the absolute growth, Nizam Telangana region has grown more than the other two regions, since the state formation.

 

But here is a more important observation. Separatists mislead their supporters claiming that “self-rule” will change the face of the Nizam Telangana region. Ironically, Rayalaseema, from where 7 of the 15 chief ministers of our state hailed from, continues to be the most backward of the three regions.

 

Workers

 

FactoryEmployment

 

AgricultureOutput

 

Livestock

 

Vehicles

 

Roads

 

Power

 

MedicalFacilities

 

PerCapitaIncome

 

 

 

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http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, February 26th, 2010

Earlier I posted only Part-1 of my interview with Professor Venigalla. Now, all three parts of the interview are available on his web-site.

 

This is an inspirational and informative interview for all Telugu people who believe in our unity.

 

Please listen to the interview and share it with your friends and family.

 

As always, I am grateful to you for your support for this monumental cause.

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-1-of-3

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-2-of-3

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-3-of-3

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Separatist leaders and intellectuals often claim that people’s desire for a separate Nizam Telangana state is over 50 years. These claims being made by the separatists are untrue. To the contrary, it is the vast majority of Telugu people’s desire for Vishalandhra that is over 50 years old.

 

The movement for a Telugu state started in 1903-04 with the formation of Young Men’s Literary Association in Guntur. This association developed a map of Andhradesa that included Telugu-speaking provinces of Madras Presidency, Central Provinces, Nizam dominions, and the Mysore state.

 

In 1912, when Congress Party leaders held their 21st Krishna-Guntur district conference, members of the literary association proposed: “…to agitate first for the formation of a province for the Andhras comprising the coastal and Ceded districts and that later they could add the five contiguous eastern Telugu districts in the Nizam’s dominions and the Telugu-speaking areas in the Central Provinces.”

 

As a result of these efforts, the “Father of the Andhra Movement” Sri Konda Venkatapayya undertook the task of leading the movement for a separate state. Andhra Mahasabha was born as a result of these grassroots efforts. The organization held its first meeting in Bapatla in 1913. In addition to 2000 visitors, 800 delegates from Kosta, Seema, Nagpur, Warangal, and Hyderabad attended the conference.

 

The struggle for a Telugu state went on for a couple of decades. The organization was able to convince Gandhiji to agree in principle to the formation of a Telugu state. They even sent delegations to London to make a case for Telugu province.

 

In March 1936, on Ugadi, Vishalandhra proponents carried a map of Andhrarashtramu in a procession through the streets of Bezawada. The map consisted of the Telugu-speaking areas of the Madras presidency, Orissa, Mysore, and Hyderabad. Hundreds of people gathered on the banks of the Krishna River and took a pledge to achieve an Andhra province.

 

Sataavadhaanulu Srinivasa Sodarulu compiled a book titled “Andhra Raashtramu” in 1940. Given below are a couple of poems from 1940, 16 years before a united Telugu state formed. The writers’ affinity for Telugus living in all the regions, including the Madras presidency, Hyderabad state, and Orissa, becomes clear from these poems.

 

After India achieved independence there was intense lobbying by Telugus for an Andhra state. Government appointed Dar commission to sort out the issue and it recommended against linguistic provinces.

 

On August 15, 1949, Father of the Andhra Movement, Konda Venkatapayya died without realizing his dream for a Telugu state.

 

Then the JVP committee was formed- made up of Jawaharlal Nehru, Vallabhai Patel, and Dr. Pattabhi Sitaramayya. These efforts failed too, as the issue of Madras became contentious. Telugus claimed their right to Madras city as it historically belonged to them and the region was given to the British by the erstwhile Vijayanagara kings who ruled from Chandragiri after the empire’s downfall.

 

In January 1950, APCC general body met at Madras and passed a resolution demanding Madras be the temporary capital of Andhra province and upon creation of Vishalandhra, Hyderabad become the permanent capital.

 

Swami Sitaram, a Congress Party worker who became a Saadhu, took up the cause that Venkatapayya fought for decades. He started his fast unto death on August 16, 1951. 35 days into Swami Sitaram’s fast, Vinoba Bhave intervened and convinced Sitaram to give up his fast and promised to reason with Nehru. However, Bhave failed to impress upon Nehru for the formation of a Telugu state.

 

Potti Sriramulu consulted Swami Sitaram and obtained permission to start his fast until death. After 57 days of fasting Potti Sriramulu passed away. Following Amarajeevi’s death there was widespread violence and Nehru agreed to the formation of the Andhra state. Telugus' claim to Madras was denied by Nehru, given Rajaji’s intense lobbying.

 

Telangana separatists often cite an article written by Sri M. Narayan Reddy, former M.P. from Nizamabad where he referenced Potti Sriramulu’s letters about the status of Madras and claims that Potti Sriramulu fast was just to win Madras for Telugus.

 

Yes, Madras was a contentious issue at that time. However, Sri Narayan Reddy looked through a narrow prism to reach his conclusions. He ignored 50 years of Telugus’ struggles for a state, which culminated in the death of Potti Sriramulu.

 

Now, let’s switch gears and quickly look at Nizam Telangana.

 

Peasants of Nizam Telangana rose up against the feudal system and shook up the foundation of the Hyderabad state. Following Police Action initiated by the Indian government, Hyderabad state became free of Nizam’s atrocious rule.

 

Nehru publicly expressed disinterest for Vishalandhra accusing Telugus of having imperialistic tendencies. He appointed Fazal Ali commission to make a recommendation on the future of Hyderabad state’s constitution. As expected, Fazal Ali toed Nehru’s line and recommended keeping Nizam Telangana region as a separate state for 5 years.

 

The elected representatives of the Nizam Telangana region rose up against the irrational recommendation made by Fazal Ali. Legislators of the Hyderabad state met and debated the issue for a week in the Assembly. Under the leadership of Burugula Ramakrishna Rao, they discussed a resolution favoring the creation of Vishalandhra. Out of 174 representatives in the Assembly, 103 favored Vishalandhra, 29 favored a Telangana state, whereas 15 remained neutral. If one just takes people’s representatives from the Nizam Telangana region, 59 favored Vishalandhra, whereas 25 favored Telangana, and 1 remained neutral.

 

Clearly, there is overwhelming evidence that Telugus across Nizam, Kosta, and Seema wanted to be part of Andhra Pradesh. This desire existed ever since the Young Men’s Literary Association was formed in A.D. 1904. At the time of the formation of Andhra Pradesh state an overwhelming 70% of the people’s representatives from Nizam Telangana supported Vishalandhra.

 

So, how can the separatists claim that Telugu people from the Nizam region wanted a separate state for over 50 years?

 

 Poem-1

 

Poem-2

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Monday, February 15th, 2010

Professor Mohan Venigalla is a professor at George Mason University and has been doing his online radio show "Mohana Muralee GaanaLahari" for three years. On the eve of the 3rd anniversary of his show, I participated in his program. Here is the audio of the first of the 3-part interview.  If you visit his telugloble website, you will also find a blog I posted on teenage unemployment (not related to the crisis in our state)

I will post the rest of the links to the program as Mohan garu makes them available.

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-1-of-3

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Saturday, February 13th, 2010

1) What is the source of 33 crore rupees shown as balance of funds?

 

I've scanned the copy of the news paper I have from from June 16th 1968:

http://www.myteluguroots.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/33-Crores-2.jpg (please download and view it in an image editor for better resolution)
 

33 Crores Balance of Funds

 

2) Investments in Hyderabad from other regions
 

This should be welcomed. Every developed country welcomes those that want to establish businesses in their cities/states with open arms. Even A.P. welcomes investments from other states and countries.
 

3) Discrimination in irrigation projects
 

The most controversial aspect of the current separatist movement is canal irrigation. Despite the tens of thousands of crores that government invested in this area, since the formation of the state, our government succeeded in adding a mere 3.3 lakh hectares to canal irrigation as of 2006-07. Of these 3.3 lakh hectares, 1.6 lakh hectares are in Nizam Telangana, 1.3 in Kosta, and 39 thousand hectares in Seema. Now, compare that with the 14 lakh hectares brought under irrigation using tube-wells. Please note that I am not talking about ayacut area, as that does not mean much, because we can build all the canals we want, but if there is no water they are useless. We have a canal going through our lands in Nalgonda and we haven't seen a drop of water in it till today. I am talking about actual area under canal irrigation as published in the Statistical Abstract published by the government.

We can argue till the cows come home about how projects are favoring one region or the other. Bottom line, government failure in implementing projects is across the regions and the data does not support that one region was neglected at the expense of other. Also, the current separatist movement precedes Jalayagnam when TRS aligned with the Congress.

Lastly, I personally am not in favor of Polavaram as I think the investment doesn’t justify the returns it will yield. A large number of people are being displaced due to Polavaram. Also, there are credible scientists arguing that it will have the same silt problem that Sriramsagar is having- which is typical to Godavari basin. Lastly, if we build Polavaram, we will lose some of the Krishna water to other states as per Bachawat ruling.

If there is one lesson we can learn from 5 decades of mis-investments into irrigation, mega irrigation projects are a colossal failure in terms of return on investment. The best mode of irrigation is tanks and unfortunately they continue to deteriorate by day.
 

4) "Because, both the major rivers krishna and godavari flow through telangana, the region has the right to first utlize its share of water. This is the rule everywhere in the world".

 

No, this NOT an international norm. If Karnataka and Maharashtra adopt this logic, they can use all the river waters they want. Bachawat did extensive study on this subject. He studied both the American and the International models. The internationally accepted rule is “protection of existing uses”. In other words, if there is a project already built, you cannot take water from that project and give it to other projects. Karnataka has 43.7% of the Krsihna river catchment area, while our state has 29.4%. Despite it, Bachawat awarded 700 TMC to Karnataka and 800 TMC to Andhra Pradesh.

 

5) Potti Sriramulu
 

Amarajeevi’s fast was not for Madras. His death was the culmination of 50 years of Telugu’s struggle for a state. I delved into this in my book. Yes, people during his funeral shouted “Madras Manade’, but that is looking at the history through a narrow prism.
 

6) Raavi Narayan Reddy, Komaram Bheem and other legendaries not in history books
 

Rudrama Devi is a Telangana icon and can be found in all history books. I remember reading about Andhra Pitamaha Madapati Hanumanth Rao, Suravaram Pratap Reddy, Sarojani Naidu and others when in school. I haven't seen an objective study showing discrimination by region in history books. If that in fact is the case, let’s fight for it- separate state is not the solution. I personally am very fond of Raavi Narayan Reddy and believe that he should be cited prominently in our school books.

 

 “Veera Telangana Naadhi, Veru Telangana Kaadhu”
- Raavi Narayan Reddy

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

For the education statistics I’ve published for the three regions of Coastal Andhra, Rayalaseema, and Nizam Telangana, many have claimed that the numbers are misleading. The chief claim is that the numbers include public and private education. The separatists have argued that Nizam Telangana was discriminated when it came to government expenditure on public schooling.

 

I have done a quick analysis on primary and high schools and the results were revealing to say the least.

 

The data for the below given analysis was sourced from the Statistical Abstract of Andhra Pradesh 2007. I have used 2001 population numbers to normalize student population.

 

Government aided schools are made up of: Central Government, State Government, Zilla Parishad, Municipal, and Aided Schools.

 

Let us start our analysis with primary school students in government aided schools.

 

 

 

As you can see, the numbers speak for themselves. There are more students supported by the government in the Nizam Telangana region than in the other regions. I urge my Kosta and Seema brethren to not make too much noise about it, as the difference is fairly negligible. I think the important note all of us should make is that there is no apparent discrimination across regions.

 

Then some have made the argument that there are fewer teachers per student in the Nizam Telangana. So, let’s look at the numbers:

 

 

The number of teachers indeed is fewer in the Nizam Telangana region. However, the difference is not significant. So, I urge my Nizam Telangana brethren to exercise restraint and wait till we get to the high school student numbers. Again, let me underscore that there is no visible discrimination between regions.

 

Now, let’s move on to the category of government aided High Schools:

 

 

In this category Nizam Telangana leads other regions. In fact, the numbers get better when Hyderabad and Rangareddi are eliminated. That is partly because of more emphasis on private education in Hyderabad and Rangareddi districts.

 

Now let us look at the number of teachers situation:

Again Nizam Telangana leads in the number of teachers category in all combinations. There are 12 government aided teachers for every 10000 people in Nizam, compared to 10.8 in Kosta and 10.7 in Seema.

 

In conclusion, the above data clearly shows that there is no evidence whatsoever of discrimination against Nizam Telangana. When the state came into existence, thanks to Nizam’s atrocious rule, education in Nizam Telangana was in shambles. We’ve made significant strides since then.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Professor Kodandaram is the Convener of the Joint Action Committee that is spearheading the current separatist movement. In his article titled “Telangana Marginalised” he claims that in Nizam’s Hyderabad state, the Telangana region was doing well in agriculture and industrial development. He further claims that the growth was disrupted after Telugus united in the form of Andhra Pradesh state. The most heinous statement that the Professor makes is that Nizam Telangana has become an internal colony after the formation of the state.

 

The undeniable truth is that we were a colony under Nizam who sucked the blood out of poor peasants. Four thousand men and women who lost their lives fighting Nizam are the reminders of that atrocious rule.

 

Sri Raavi Narayana Reddy, was one of the prominent leaders who led the peasants against Nizam. According to Sri Reddy, taxation in the Hyderabad state was 25% to 300% more than in other areas of the country. Peasants were required to pay a fixed tax called a levy, which they had to pay regardless of the output derived from the farmland. If there was a dispute between two people, before it could be settled, they had to pay a “dispute tax.” If a family member died, you could not cremate that person unless you paid the “ash tax.” Then, there was a war tax to finance the British in World War II. There were over 26 different kinds of taxes in enforcement.

 

If this oppressive taxation was not enough, there was the system of vetti which was a form of slavery. Vetti wreaked havoc on the people of Nizam Telangana. Sri Puchalapally Sundarayya, who hailed from Kosta and fought for the peasants of Nizam Telangana, wrote:  “The vetti system had made the life of the Telangana people one of utter degradation and of abject serfdom. It had ruined man’s self-respect completely….”

 

Sadly, Professor Kodandaram does not mind demonizing his fellow Telugus, yet he shows no hesitation to sugar-coat Nizam’s rule by saying that the region was doing well in agriculture and industrial development.

 

Let’s move on to the statistical data that the Professor offers as evidence of “colonization” of Nizam Telangana.

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “The irrigation policies illustrate the discrimination against Telangana…AP gave high priority to irrigation… As a consequence net irrigated area increased from 27.47 lakh hectares to 55 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-02.

 

The gross area under irrigation in our state in 1956 was 32 lakh hectares. As of 2005-2006, that number stands at 60 lakh hectares. In other words, we brought 28 additional lakh hectares under irrigation. Out of these 28 lakh hectares, 15 lakhs are in the Nizam Telangana area, 10 lakh hectares in the Kosta area, and 3 lakh hectares in the Rayalaseema area.

 

Is this what Professor Kodandaram offers as evidence of discrimination?

 

Professor Kodandaram further wrote: “A lion’s share, 90 per cent, in the public expenditure on irrigation was allocated for major and medium irrigation and minor irrigation received only 10 per cent of the allocation. This policy has resulted in the decline of the minor irrigation particularly tank irrigation and consequently the net area under tank irrigation declined from 10.68 lakh hectares to 5.67 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-02. In contrast the net area irrigated by canals has gone up from 12.92 lakh hectares to 15 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-2002. The deterioration of the tank irrigation system has an adverse affect on Telangana more than the other regions because tanks have been the backbone of Telangana agriculture. Further, the loss of the area under the tank irrigation has not been compensated by allocation of river waters.

 

Let us look at Canal irrigation first. In 1956, when the united state came into existence, we had 12.9 lakh hectares under canal irrigation. Despite all the government investments into canal irrigation, as of 2005-06 that number stands at 15.7 lakh hectares. In other words, we brought an additional 2.8 lakh hectares of land under canal irrigation. Of these 2.8 lakh hectares, 1.5 lakh hectares are in the Nizam Telangana area, about 70 thousand hectares in Kosta, and about 60 thousand hectares in Rayalaseema.

 

Is this what Professor Kodandaram offers as evidence of colonization?

 

Professor Kodandaram’s argument about abject neglect of tanks in the Nizam Telangana region and how farmers are relying on bore-wells are valid. However, let us not forget that the losses to the Rayalaseema region in tank irrigation are much steeper than Nizam Telangana. Ironically, half our state’s chief ministers hailed from Rayalaseema.

 

In 1956 Nizam Telangana had 4.5 lakh hectares under tank irrigation, and as of 2005-06 that stands at 2.5 lakh hectares, a 43% drop. In Rayalaseema at the time of state formation 1.6 lakh hectares were under tank irrigation and as of 2005-06, mere 81,000 acres is under tank irrigation- a drop of over 50%. So, were the chief ministers hailing from Rayalaseema discriminating against their own region?

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “Nearly 60 per cent of the net area irrigated under canals is located in these four districts and the balance 40 per cent is shared by the other 18 districts.

 

The Professor conveniently forgets to mention one important fact. These four Kosta districts had all that area under canal irrigation for nearly 100 years before our state even came into existence. That is because of the Dowleswaram and Krishna barrages built by Sir Arthur Cotton. Those Kosta districts did not get canal irrigation at the expense of Rayalaseema or Nizam Telangana. However, Professor Kodandaram wants his followers to believe that it was done at the expense of other regions.

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “If the (Gentlemen’s) agreement were to be seriously implemented all the schemes proposed by the Hyderabad Government too would have been constructed to divert nearly 1,000 tmcs of Krishna and Godavari water to irrigate the fields in the region. Today, on record, Telangana gets a mere 277 tmc of water, which is far less in reality. If the Jalyagnam is implemented Telangana will lose its share in the river water permanently. The same situation prevails in the other sector too.

 

There is no verbiage in the Gentlemen’s agreement that indicates Nizam Telangana would get 1000 TMC of water. Lastly to Jalayagnam- doesn’t irrigation minister Ponnala Lakshmaiah hail from Warangal district? Does Professor Kodandaram think that the well-educated and well-respected minister from Nizam Telangana would work against the interests of his own region? As of 2006-07, under Jalayagnam, Rs. 6,801 crore (54.84%) were expended on Nizam Telangana, Rs. 2,931 crore (24.38%) on Kosta, and Rs. 2,289 (19.02%) on Rayalaseema.

 

In conclusion, we in Nizam Telangana should fight for every rightful drop of Krishna and Godavari River waters that have been allocated to us by Bachawat. Our leadership should focus on improving the tank irrigation and at the very least restore it to where it was 50-100 years ago. We don’t need a separate state to achieve these goals. We need leadership that is committed to serving the people. Sadly this is not a top priority for the separatist leaders, as they are busy pitting one region against another.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010

Separate state proponents often gripe about the name of our state as some sort of a conspiracy. So, let us peek into our history to understand how our state got its name- Andhra Pradesh.

 

Our tribe was originally called the Andhras and the term Telugu came much later. Some of the early mentions of Andhras were found in the Aitareya Brahmana of 600 BC. Whereas, the early references to Telugus were found many centuries later in the Puri inscription of the Indra Verma of Gangas.

 

Andhra and Telangana interchangeably represent the same region and sect of people i.e., those living in the state of Andhra Pradesh.

 

In the Kakatiya Empire, Telangana represented the current geography of Andhra Pradesh and bordering areas.

 

Nizam for some time ruled the entire geography of the current Andhra Pradesh, as well as parts of today’s Karnataka and Maharashtra. Under Nizam, Telugu region was called Telangana.

 

In 1800’s, French and British had their eyes set on Telangana’s coastline for defense and maritime reasons. When Nizam Asaf Jah died, his sons got into a bitter fight for the Hyderabad throne. By taking sides with the feuding princes, French got hold of Coastal Telangana i.e., today’s Kosta or Coastal Andhra. Later on, the British wrestled Coastal Telangana out of French hands.

 

Ironically, as recently as 60 years ago, Telugus living in Nizam Telangana used to passionately identify themselves as the Andhras. When Telugus living under Nizam established libraries in their region, they called them Andhra Bhaasha Nilayamulu.

 

One of the oldest non-government libraries in Nizam Telangana was established in 1901, in Ramkoti, Hyderabad and was named Sri Krishnadevaraya Andhra Bhasha Nilayam. This library later became a hub for cultural and political activity for Telugus suffering under Nizam rule. Similarly, when Telugus living in the Telangana heartland Warangal wanted to establish a library in the early 1900s, they named it Raja Raja Narendra Andhra Bhasha Nilayam. Again, in 1923, another library established in Hyderabad was called Vemana Andhra Bhasha Nilayam.

 

Telugus living under Nizam faced atrocious discrimination. Urdu and Maratha were the dominant languages while Telugu language was often ridiculed as “Telangi Bedhanghi”.

 

In 1921, in the Hyderabad’s Vivekavardhani Theater, a public meeting was held. All the speakers spoke in Urdu or Maratha. When it was the turn of high court lawyer Allampalli Venkatarama Rao, he got up and spoke in Telugu. Participants in the meeting protested to him speaking in his mother tongue and shouted down his speech.

 

This incident was the starting point for Telugus rising up against Nizam. Telugu men left this meeting in frustration and formed an organization called Andhra Jana Sangham- yes, not Telugu Jana Sangham not Telangana Jana Sangham, but Andhra Jana Sangham.

 

Andhra Jana Sangham later changed its name to Andhra Mahasabha. To differentiate itself from the Kosta organization carrying the same name, it was called the Nizam Andhra Mahasabha or NAMS.

 

Nizam was troubled with the use of Andhra in all the organizations and institutions that Telugus in Nizam Telangana were forming. He suspected Hyderabad state Telugus of having an ulterior motive to merge with their Kosta and Seema brethren in the neighboring Madras Presidency.

 

Once, Nizam’s emissary and close confidant, Nawab Aliyar Zang, approached Andhra Pitamaha Madapati Hanumanth Rao and said: “…it came to our government’s notice that the purpose of your Andhra movement is to merge the Andhra districts of Madras and the Andhra districts of Nizam’s dominion.”

 

Despite Nizam’s overt concerns about the use of the term Andhra, Telugus refused to rename their organization to Telangana Mahasabha or Telugu Mahasabha.

 

I go into a greater detail about Nizam Andhra Mahasabha’s heroic fight against Nizam in my book. But, here’s the gist- Nizam Andhra Mahasabha went on to become a formidable organization that became Nizam’s worst nightmare. It shook up the foundation of the Hyderabad state. In the violent struggle against the Razakars, thousands of Nizam Andhra Mahasabha leaders gave up their lives.

 

So, where did this current antagonism for the term “Andhra” come from?

 

In 1953, Nehru described Telugus desire to merge into one state as “expansionist imperialism”. Taking advantage of Nehru’s disinclination for a unified state, leaders like Dr. Marri Chenna Reddy, who till then were in favor of an integrated state, demanded a separate Telangana state. However, there was an overwhelming desire across all the Telugu regions for Vishalandhra. As a result, Nehru held extensive negotiations with the leaders of all the regions and conceded to the formation of a united Telugu state.

 

Telugu’s dream for Vishalandhra became a reality with the signing of the Gentlemen’s Agreement. One of the sticking points during the negotiations was the name of the state. Leaders from Kosta and Rayalaseema wanted to name the state Andhra Pradesh, while some of the leaders from Nizam Telangana wanted to name it Andhra-Telangana. In the end agreement was reached to name the state Andhra Pradesh.

 

So, that is the origin for today’s claims about Kosta conspiracy to name the state Andhra Pradesh. However, the undeniable fact is that Telugu people scattered across Tamil, Kannada, Maratha, and Oriya regions have always identified themselves as Andhras.

 

There is no conspiracy behind calling ourselves Andhras. We all are Andhras, we all are Telingis, and we all are Telugus. The new definition of Andhra to represent Kosta and the new definition of Telangana to represent nine districts of Nizam Telangana is a fabrication of politicians intending to create a wedge between the Telugu tribe.

 

The same breed of separatist politicians is continuing to harvest hatred among Telugus after more than five decades since our state came into existence. Sadly, my Telugu brethren are continuing to fall for the separatists’ antics.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Sunday, January 10th, 2010

Thank you to all of you who took the time to respond to my note. This is a difficult and emotional issue for all Telugu people and the passion is quite understandable. I obviously cannot answer every comment that is posted, but I will try to clarify my position on some of the specific questions that were raised.

 

First and foremost, a big thank you to all my fellow Telugus who support the cause for a United Andhra Pradesh.

 

If you would like me to respond to your comments, please keep them brief and specific to the issue. Here goes my response:

 

1)     There was quite a bit of controversy around the data I published. I have cited sources for every single data point I presented in my book. Please note that all the sources I have used are publicly available in Andhra Pradesh. I spent two months in India circling public libraries and government offices gathering the data. If any of you find inaccuracies in the data I presented, all I ask for is scanned pages of the documents that show the mistake and I will go ahead and correct my numbers right away. The real issue that should worry all of you is how someone who doesn’t even live in the state can gather so much data in two months, while scores of professors in A.P. who spend their lifetime in research are not publishing results like this. Is there anything more important in A.P. than this particular issue at this moment?

 

2)     There has been a lot of chatter about using percentages to show the relative growth of each region. I urge you all to read my commentary closely. I have mentioned multiple times that percentages in some cases can exaggerate the growth. In every one of those instances I provided normalized numbers.

 

3)     The comment about why our state was named Andhra Pradesh and not Telangana or Telugu Pradesh. I provided the history behind our state’s name in my book. Also, lookout for my upcoming note on this exact topic.

 

4)     I found a compelling argument made by one of the bloggers. His point was, if Kosta had 11 lakh hectares under canal irrigation before the united state came into existence, where did the Nagarjunasagar dam water went? Here are the canal irrigation numbers by decade. You will notice that the area under irrigation goes up starting 1971, which is attributable to Nagarjunasagar. The fluctuations in the canal irrigation area, I have to presume, are related to the amount of rainfall received in each of those years. I will leave rest of the data interpretation up to the blogger:

 

Canal Irrigation in Hectares for years: 1956, 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991, 2001

 

Kosta: 1106258, 1104754, 1208432, 1279453, 1369821, 1224559

Rayalaseema: 70860, 94401, 150287, 144259, 147164, 124567

Nizam Telangana: 114720, 132076, 220106, 269080, 351882, 300261

 

5)     There were questions about 6-point formula, Gentlemen’s agreement and other topics. I have delved into all of those in my book.

 

6)     Then there was a point made about 1700 TMC going waste into ocean- not sure if the blogger was referring to Krishna or Godavari. Though the number seems very high, I am going to assume Krishna, as Godavari is a lesser controversy.

 

I do not know the exact quantity of Krishna TMC going into the ocean. I am willing to accept your number for the sake of this discussion. However, remember that these are flood waters and are not a reliable source. 800 TMC is what Bachawat determined as available to us with 75% dependability. Building large scale projects to tap waters that may come once in five years may not be the most prudent approach. I reiterate my point that tank irrigation is the best source for districts that are at a higher altitude.

 

7)     Another comment was made about my analysis on election results in Chapter 20 of my book. The blogger presents a compelling argument that almost all political parties supported the Telangana state during the elections. My point is that when the by-election was presented by TRS as those that are for separation versus those that are not, TRS lost miserably. If separation of the state was high on people’s agenda, TRS should have swept the last two elections. Saying that, I see the bloggers line of reasoning and hence I said clearly in my book, “the case for a separate Telangana state is not clear cut.”

 

'8)    Then comments about cultural differences between regions. These are somewhat subjective. I will leave it up to the readers to make up their minds. I come from a school of thought that there are many common cultural aspects that have bound Telugus together for over 2000 years, as opposed to the differences created in the last 100-200 years- thanks to the British, French, and Islamic invaders.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

 

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Sunday, January 3rd, 2010
Telugu tribe today stands at a crossroads. Next few months will decide the fate of our race. Unfortunately, the people of our state have little say in these vital decisions. Our future today rests with the leaders at the center, and opportunistic separatist politicians of our state. The leaders at the center neither understand our history nor have any interest in protecting our race. On the other hand, the separatist politicians neither have facts nor history on their side. They therefore are holding the people of our great state hostage with the threat of violence.
 

Our future today looks bleak. However, I believe we can change the tide, if the good people of our state rise up against this atrocity being committed by the separatist politicians. There were many instances in our history when Telugus fought back from the brink of extinction.

 

After the demise of the Satavahana Empire, Telugu country was in a state of utter disarray. From nowhere came a king named Rudradeva, ruler of a small principality of Warangal. With the consummation of Kakatiya Empire, he achieved something that was till then deemed impossible. Rudradeva united the Telugu country that disintegrated after the demise of the Satavahana Empire.

 Delhi’s formidable Muslim army occupied entire India. During this process Tuglaq mercilessly destroyed the Kakatiya Empire. When things looked bleak for Telugus, a common soldier named Prolaya Nayak and his cousin Krishna Nayak from Musunuru, raised an army and dared to achieve something no other Indian king could achieve. The brave Krishna Nayak drove away Tuglaq out of Telugu land and took back Sultanpur i.e., Warangal.
 
Then there is Vijayanagara Empire, founded by two brothers from Warangal- Harihara and Bukka. The legendary duo consolidated entire South India under their rule. When northern India was besieged by invaders that came from across the border, Harihara and Bukka built an empire that acted as an impregnable wall against the invading armies. They protected the entire South India including today’s Andhra Pradesh, Tamilnadu, Karnataka, and Kerala. During these battles, millions of our forefathers sacrificed their lives – sometimes losing half a million men in a single war. Despite these monumental losses, our forefathers refused to give in to the enemy. What inspired them to make such sacrifices? There can’t be any other reason, but to protect our culture, our heritage, our history, and our identity.
 

My friends- Telugu people are capable of rising up even when backed into a corner. If history is any guide, we should be optimistic. My recently published book- “My Telugu Roots: Telangana State Demand – A Bhasmasura Wish” delves into the details of our glorious past. My Telugu Roots goes through many aspects of our medieval and modern history in the context of current demands for a separate state.

 

In many of the debates occurring over the separation of our state, there is a lack of statistical data to respond to allegations of regional discrimination. I have put the entire Chapter 19: “Telangana State Demand Built on a Platform of Lies” online. You will find comprehensive statistical data in a simplified format to help you with your arguments for unification.

 

The current so-called student movement is a mere repetition of 1969, when politicians used high school and college students for their selfish ends. Learning about the Jai Telangana movement of 1969 is crucial to put the current violence into context. Please find the entire chapter 17: “Jai Telangana- Chenna Reddy versus Indira Gandhi“, online at my website.

 

I will be writing regularly on the crisis in our state. Join me on my website at http://www.myteluguroots.com, or on my facebook page and twitter at the links given below. Please share my website link with your friends and family.

 

SAVE ANDHRA PRADESH!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445 http://twitter.com/nalamotu