Posts Tagged ‘chakravarthy’

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

On Monday September 19th afternoon, I got an SMS from my kid’s school that they are closing on Tuesday in light of the bandh. I was a little troubled with the SMS and I called up the school and spoke with the head teacher to understand how the decision to shut the school down was arrived at. The teacher said it was a management decision and she had no role in it. I urged her to have a makeup day for the school. She said they were going to do that anyway.

Tuesday evening I got another SMS saying that the school is closed for the rest of the week. This SMS worried me and I wanted to get to the bottom of the issue. My concern was about Glendale management taking such an important decision as shutting down the school for a week without consulting the parents. So, I decided to meet the head mistress.

I went to the school with another parent who is a good friend of ours. We requested the head mistress to help us understand how the decision to close the school down for a week was arrived at. Here are the reasons she gave-

Originally the management planned to keep the school open throughout the week. However, on Monday the 19th, separatist hooligans descended on a nearby Kendriya Vidyalay and asked the principal to close the school. When he refused, they physically assaulted him. Later in the day, Chirec school bus was stopped by separatists. It was stranded for sometime after which it was let go. On top of this, schools have been getting more phone calls than usual from separatist outfits urging them to close the school.

Taking all these factors into consideration, managements of different schools in the neighbourhood consulted each other and decided to close the schools down en-masse for at least a week.

I wished the schools showed a bit more courage, but their plight is understandable. The risk of their buses and their staff becoming targets of separatist attacks is their biggest concern.

My main complaint with the school management was that they haven’t consulted the parents when they took as serious a decision as closing the school down for a week. The head mistress argued that they didn’t have time to take parents into confidence as it was an emergency decision. I urged her to consider having a parents meeting at least now so that we can brainstorm together as a team about how to handle any future bandh calls. The head mistress agreed to a parents meeting and I am hoping it will happen soon.

Now to the question of what can parents do in this situation?

First and foremost, we as parents need to come to a realization that police forces are rarely effective when it comes to people’s movements. With thousands of schools and lakhs of children, there just isn’t enough police force to protect all. This problem is universal and applies to more developed societies too. Take for example, 1992 riots in Los Angeles, or last year’s riots in France, or this year’s riots in UK.

Here is my view on how this problem should be tackled:

  • Clearly school buses are an easy target for separatists. On the days when a bandh call is given, instead of sending kids in the school bus, parents should drop off their kids at school.
  • Parent groups should identify children that do not have conveyance and have them carpool with families that live close by.
  •  Lastly and most importantly, parents should volunteer to defend the school staff and children on bandh days. It is not needed for all the parents to be at the school. A small group of 20-30 volunteers is all it takes. This, in my view, is the best way of stopping the separatists from forcibly closing down our kids’ schools.

If you are a parent and your child’s school has been closed down, please consider meeting the school management. Urge them to make parents part of the decision making process. Mobilize other parents to the best of your ability and brainstorm ways in which you can ensure that the schools stay open. Our children have lost too many school days this year. Parents need to take a more active part in ensuring that schools run smoothly. This responsibility cannot be outsourced to the government. After all, this is about your child’s future.

Save Andhra Pradesh! 

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

 

http://www.visalandhra.org

http://www.facebook.com/visalandhra

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

 

  

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

Thank you to all those of you that expressed concern with regards to my safety. I would like to take this opportunity to clarify some of the distortions that have been put out by several media houses in the last 24 hours.

 

I have been working on getting my book translated for over 3 months and the work on it has completed recently. I was originally planning to release before July 27th the telugu version of my book titled "Mana Telugu Talli- Asatyala Punadula Pai Nirmithamaina Telangana Verpatuvaadam". Friends have advised that I shouldn't do given the prevailing tensions associated with the elections, and I heeded. Then I was again advised not to release when the election results are coming out given the prevailing tensions. I finally decided to release the book on August 2nd as I have been away from my wife and kids for an extended period and I was not willing to postpone my departure date yet again.

 

As a precautionary measure, I've requested for police protection and informed the police about my plans. They cautioned me to do the release on another day. I told them that the invitations have already been sent out and I can't change the date. The event was held at the Press Club in Somajiguda. There were two doors to the room where the event was held- one in the front and another in the back. A.B.K. Prasad, K. Rajshekharam, Dara Sambaiah, C. Narasimha Rao, and C. Srinivas were the guests. First Narasimha Rao garu spoke, then A.B.K. Prasad garu released the book and started speaking.

 

As the speech was going on, a couple of people in the back started shouting slogans and tried to rush towards the dias. Venkateswarao garu, Punnam garu and others who came in our support stopped them from reaching me. While all this was going on, one of the protestors managed to come through the front door, and threw a book at A.B.K. Prasad garu, but it didn't hit him. Then the same person tried to assault me. Punnam garu and Venkatewsarao garu standing near the dias immediately pounced on him. The protestor at this point managed to throw the book at me with force, which landed straight on my head. I was slightly hurt, and one of the lens from my spectacles fell off.

 

There were about 5-7 protestors. After about five minutes of pushing and shoving, people who came in my support have managed to push them out of the room.

 

By then some of the guests have left the room to watch the unfolding scene outside. What happened outside has been for the most part captured on the cameras and has been aired on TV.

 

I told the people in the room that I intend to finish the book release function and refuse to leave without exercising my fundamental right to express my opinion. Someone in the audience went out and asked the guests to come back in. The press also came back into the room. We've all again sat on the stage and I talked about my book for about 10 minutes, then I condemned the assault on freedom of speech and how everyone should notice what has happened. I urged people to fight for their fundamental rights. After this Srinivas garu gave an inspiring speech and told how he respectfully disagreed with my position. At this point we ended the function.

 

The press people refused to leave and insisted that I give an interview. In the meantime one of my friends came in and told me that I am not obligated to give an interview as this is a book release function, and not a press meet. He suggested that I should leave immediately as the crowd is building outside. Punnam garu suggested that I take three questions and leave. That seemed like a decent compromise, but the press people protested saying that three is too few. I said that I will take three questions and that's it. First question came from a journalist and he went on rambling for 5 minutes about how Nizam region suffered without asking the question. I interrupted him a couple of times to ask the question, but he wasn't in a mood to ask, but tell. Then I moved on to a second journalist, and his question was- "meeru telangana dopidiki guri kaledu ani enduku antunnaru?". At this point I realized that these jounalists are not interested in an interview, but to drag me into an argument. I got up and left the room.

 

When I got out, an army of media people pounced on me. They didn't let me go and started accusing me of all sorts of things imaginable. There were a group of 20-30 police, but they didn't dare to rescue me. A lone police officer waded through the crowd, approached me and said I should leave right away for the sake of my safety. I told him that that is exactly what I am trying to do, but I am unable to find my car in the crowd. He said first get in my jeep and leave, we will find your car.

 

The press pounced on the police officer accusing him of interefering with freedom of press and hurled all sorts of regional insults at him. He said he was not helping me, but protecting me. They then shouted at him asking why then has he asked me to get in his jeep. At this point, the police officer backed off. I was again left to myself to find my car as the journalists continued to harass me. I eventually found my car, but the press people refused to let my car go and blocked it. I got in my car and shut the door. They forcibly opened the car door and would not let me close it. The police officer who tried to help me earlier, again came to my rescue. He pushed the people blocking my car aside, shut the door and asked us to leave immediately and we did.

 

This is what has happened on that eventful day. Contrary to the media reports, we in fact have finished the entire book release function and only then left the press club.

 

A couple of quick clarifications on some of the allegations.

 

- There has been a lot of noise about where I come from. I refuse to be identified by region, as I believe these divisions and regions have been created by invaders. I have never claimed myself to be a Telanganite, I've only said that my native place is Nalgonda. So, here is everything I know about my roots. I was born in Hyderabad. My father and mother were both born in Nalgonda district. My father was born in my native village near Nalgonda, while my mother was born in a village near Kodad. My paternal grand father and paternal grand mother (nayanamma) were also born in Nalgonda district. My great grand mother (my paternal grand father's mother) came from a village in Guntur nearly hundred years ago. On the other hand, my nayanamma's family is from a village near Miryalguda. Her father and forefathers were village patels and that tradition is continuing to this day. My nayanamma's family members still act as village officers in their village near Miryalguda.

 

- A TV channel has been carrying a vicious campaign that I am promoting Samaikyandhra to protect my Rs. 300 crores assets in and around Hyderabad. I can categorically state that my assets are not even worth a fraction of that. On top of it, common sense dictates that if I really care about my assets, I should stay quiet and not stand up to fight.

 

Last few days events have only increased my resolve to fight against separatism with all my might- and this will not be the last time you will hear from me. The fight will go on.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Here are the links to the TV interviews we have done a few weeks ago. Studio N interview conducted by Ramesh Garu is by far the most comprehensive interview I have done on TV. Of all the TV anchors that interviewed me, Ramesh Garu was the only one that read my book and you will notice the difference in the quality of interview. The program lasted for an hour without any commercial breaks.

 

Studio N Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=642a8qejPGc
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJx7gtt63o
Part3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGlYBumFxBk
Part4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FgCrHXYHLs
Part5: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_CjUq4RPLQ
Part6: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2y8koKuX6g
Part7: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfSG3bVXZrQ
Part8: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSgrLzgrL2M

 

TV9 Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=513Il_2nstM
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxbwZ3da3nc

 

NTV Interview:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkLFis-U6tI
Part2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWWWhDiBJdU
Part3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWR0Y1uArnc

 

ABN Andhra Jyothy:
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oeTJ8TyPhM
Part1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqjR1Q-bodg

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Sunday, July 11th, 2010

A number of you have asked for the details of APNRI’s meeting with the Srikrishna Committee and the Governor of Andhra Pradesh; so, here you go.
 

We’ve arrived in Hyderabad early in the morning on 15th June. Srinivas garu went to Hyderabad a couple of weeks earlier. He booked a room at a local club to use as a meeting point for everyone. We went to the room around noon and started brainstorming for the next day’s session. We’ve invited a few other folks who had presented to the Srikrishna Committee in the past to get their input. At the end of these discussions, we decided to add one more slide to our existing presentation to reflect the progressive trends around the globe towards unification. For example, East and West Germany, Turkey’s efforts to join European Union, despite deep cultural differences etc.
 

We were scheduled to meet the committee at 11 PM at the MCHR building on June 16th. We reached the gate and the police cross-checked our names against the list they had. At this point we were let in. We drove to the building and were told to go to the 2nd floor.
SKC’s multimedia manager met us in the waiting area and asked if we have a PowerPoint presentation. We gave the file in a USB-drive and they promised to load up the presentation and be ready.
 

We were ushered in after about a half-hour. We walked into the meeting room and were pleasantly surprised to see Justice Srikrishna. We were told that Srikrishna was abroad and would not be there for our session. When I enquired about his travel, he said he was in the U.S. visiting his family and just returned.
 

The large room had tables arranged in a U shape and a screen for the projector in the middle. The committee members sat in the middle. They’ve asked those who will do the presentation to sit on one side and the rest on the other side. Punnam garu, Srinivas garu, and I sat on one side and the rest of the team sat on the other side. We introduced ourselves by giving our name, State we hailed from, and the profession. After the introductions Punnam garu introduced the organization and our goals. Then we went into the presentation.
 

The presentation was basically structured into four parts: i) History of Telugus living together and background on the current movement ii) Data to show how each region performed since the State formation iii) How NRIs are impacted by the current movement iv) What we believe are some solutions to the ongoing problem
 

One other thing I figured out quickly with the SKC was that they pick up counter arguments from the separatists and use it against integrationists and they use integrationist arguments against separatists. Also, not surprisingly, SKC has never seen our submission before. The committee received thousands of submissions and these are supposed to be reviewed by the consulting companies that SKC hired. However, I doubt even if the consulting companies have the bandwidth to review what people have sent.
 

Here are some of the questions they asked us during the course of the presentation. These are not verbatim, but paraphrased to the best of our team member’s memories. Of all the members of the SKC, during our presentation Dr. Ravinder Kaur had the most sympathetic expression, while Justice Srikrishna lightened up the environment with his sense of humor. SKC has warned us upfront that they will take an opposite view to extract as much information as they can from us.
 

While presenting our views about how human relations will suffer if the State is partitioned,
Dr. Ravinder Kaur argued that: Haryana and Punjab have separated in the past and seem to be doing well.
 

APNRI Response-1: The issue of capital Chandigarh is unresolved after all these years and continues to be a sticking point.
APNRI Response-2: Divisions such as the current one proposed in Andhra Pradesh are fundamentally rooted in hatred. If people are separated on this basis, it will leave deep wounds. Families that left Pakistan after partition to this day cannot reconcile with what has happened.
 

Mr. Duggal: After all, this is a constitutionally governed country. Whether a State is divided or not, people still have the fundamental rights and they can live anywhere they want. What is the harm in division?
 

APNRI: The current demand is built on misinformation. Telugu people have a long history of living together. Separatist violence has left deep suspicions in people’s mind about their future and security. In addition to that, separatists are openly making proclamations of a great war, civil war, and turning rivers red. We are not opposed division of the State as long as there is a national framework and it is done for administrative reasons with mutual consent. However, the reasons cited for division today are untenable.
 

On our argument about Nizam region’s economy will suffer in the event of division-
 

Mr. Duggal: The new Chief Minister of a Telangana State won’t be a fool. Do you really think he will drive Andhra investors away to the detriment of Telangana State’s economy?
 

APNRI: Neither is the new Chief Minister of Andhra going to be a fool. The first day he comes into office he will announce incentives of free power, free land, and a tax free regime for businesses that move to Andhra. He will further lobby investors from Andhra to leave Telangana by arguing that they have been mistreated, attacked, and have been accused of being looters. As a result, Nizam region’s economy will suffer.
 

During the discussion around how the IT industry will be impacted-

Justice Srikrishna: How will the division impact IT industry? I understand there is some slowdown now, however, once things return to normalcy, IT sector should grow as usual.
 

APNRI: Investments are already fleeing the State in large volumes. Our research shows that the State has already fallen behind by 5 years. There are members in our organization who are staunch integrationists, yet have moved a section of their staff to Bangalore already to deal with possibility of further violence in Hyderabad.
 

Justice Srikrishna: But those are all short-term impacts. In the long-run, let’s say 5 years from today, IT industry should fall back to normalcy.
 

APNRI: In the event of two States, there will be intense competition between the two regions for IT business. As a result, some of the IT business will inevitably go to the Kosta region and this in fact would hurt the Telangana economy.
 

APNRI: Similarly, real estate sector will also suffer with investments slowing down or moving to other regions.
 

On the topic of human relationships and APNRI’s argument that people across all regions are forming relationships including some of the prominent leaders in the current separatist movement; Dr. Ravinder Kaur wanted to know how many of us that are there that day have married across regions. Three members of our team have said they have married across the regions.
 

When we gave examples of businesses moving to Bangalore, Chennai, and Shanghai-
 

Dr. Abusaleh Shariff: Hyderabad is a cosmopolitan city, just like Bangalore. Infosys recently announced that it will expand its operations. Do you think this is an issue that will affect business?
 

APNRI: Infosys entered a deal prior to the recent violence and had to expand its operations per its agreement with the government. (One of our team members gave a personal example of Citi which originally planned to start its operations in Hyderabad, but decided to move to Shanghai)
 

When we said that Smt. Gandhi’s 6-point formula has done more harm than good, by perpetuating the differences between regions-
 

Mr. Rajiv Sharma: Why blame just Gandhi. Leaders of all regions from A.P. have consented to the agreement.

 

APNRI: Mrs. Gandhi was the leader of the country and was in-charge of the agreement that was put together. Yes, A.P. leaders have to take the blame too, but it was Mrs. Gandhi who was at the helm.
 

During the concluding remarks-
 

APNRI: Justice Srikrishna, we urge you to exercise caution with the words you use in your report. We are confident that you will be objective in your assessment. Irrespective of what your recommendation may be, please see to it that there is no verbiage that reflects that there has been discrimination of one region by the other region. Your words will be used 20 years down the road to start another violent movement, the way SRC and Bachawat reports are being used.
 

Justice Srikrishna: Humorously, “Are you asking me not to use words loosely in my report?”
With that everyone laughed, exchanged pleasantries, shook hands and left the meeting. The session lasted about an hour and a half.
 

GOVERNOR’S MEETING
We went to the Raj Bhavan the following day to meet the Governor. After the security check and cross-checking of our names, we were ushered into a visitor room. After snacks and tea, we were then taken into another large room with Nizam style décor that has two large chairs and two sofas. Governor came in about 30 minutes late and apologized for the delay.
 

We presented him a copy of our report. He skimmed through it and before we could speak, he started talking. He gave an inspirational monologue about why we all should come back to India and make a difference by working in the country. We said, we are helping Indian economy through knowledge-transfer, investments, and by being cultural ambassadors of the country. I don’t think we could convince him :-)
 

We eventually managed to steer him to the topic of separation. We told him about NRI concerns with regards to law and order. He again veered around saying there is violence in other parts of the world too and that India or Hydreabad is not unique in this matter.
 

After pestering him a bit more, he eventually took off his gloves. He said that the government is paying close attention to the law and order situation. He asked if we noticed that the violence has been coming down significantly since February and then asked us: “do you think the reduction in violence is just an accident?”
 

He then assured us that the government will do everything in its power to put things in order. Interestingly, he said, there could again be violence in January and we should all be prepared for it. However, he assured that the government is taking all the measures to ensure law and order prevails.
 

That is a brief summary of our discussion.
 

Save Andhra Pradesh!
 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy
http://www.myteluguroots.com
http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445
http://twitter.com/nalamotu
http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

(This note was written based on several different conversations I had with leaders of Andhra Pradesh. Few bloggers have pointed out that Dr. Singh and Sri Mukherjee were in Delhi on December 9th, so I stand corrected. However, it is widely accepted among senior leaders in A.P. and Delhi that Chidambaram was the one that took charge and orchestrated the events that led to December 9th announcement. Dr. Singh was in Russia while these developments were going on and looks like the announcement was made soon after he reached India.

Also, one of my overzealous bloggers had slightly modified this note and I have restored the original content)

Sri Chidamabaram is the Home Minister of a country that took on Khalistani extremist violence in Punjab head-on. A country that fought three wars with Pakistan and is battling hardcore terrorists in Kashmir every day. A country that battled LTTE militants in Sri Lanka. A country that rescued Maldives that was under mercenaries’ siege. Indian military flew 2000 kilometers, drove out the combatants and restored that country’s government.

Yet, the Home Minister of one of the most powerful countries in the world, yielded to a man who was on a phony fast and was not in any imminent health danger and who in fact was eager to give up his fast even if the central government winked at him.

Instead of diffusing the crisis in A.P., what did our esteemed Home Minister do? He found an opportune moment when two senior most leaders Manmohan Singh and Pranab Mukherjee, known for their prudence and wisdom, were out of the country. On December 9th he pressured Sonia Gandhi, despite her reservations about a hasty decision being forced on her in the middle of the night, that unless she agrees to split the State, Andhra Pradesh will go up in flames. The intelligence report allegedly sent by the State authorities sympathetic to separatists came in handy to impress upon her.

In 1937 C. Rajagopalachari became the Chief Minister of Madras. He skillfully managed to divide Telugus by giving the ministerial posts to Kosta telugus and none to Rayalaseema leaders. It took a great deal of effort and signing of Sribagh pact to undo the damage done to Telugu unity by Rajagopalachari. In 1949 as Governor General, Rajagopalachari visited Hyderabad and publicly stated that he is opposed to the division of Hyderabad State, which re-energized Telugus to fight for Vishalandhra. Later on in December 1952, after Potti Sriramulu’s death, Justice Wachoo recommended making Madras the temporary capital of Telugus. Rajagopalachari threatened Nehru with his resignation and ensured that Madras was robbed from us.

Home Minister Chidambaram, like C. Rajagopalachari, is playing a spoil sport with Telugus. In an article written for Indian Express May 18, 2003, Chidambaram wrote: “In my view, there is a strong case for the creation of…Telangana (out of Andhra Pradesh, population 7.57 crore).”

While Andhra Pradesh is the 5th largest State in India, Tamilnadu happens to be the 6th largest State in the country with over 6 crores population. Yet, when PMK leader Ramadoss, in light of Chidambaram's December 9th announcement to bifurcate Andhra Pradesh, demanded similar bifurcation of Tamilnadu, Home Minister termed the demand as “meaningless and absurd” and said that the idea should be nipped in the bud.

When it came to division of his home State, the Home Minister reacted emotionally almost in a knee-jerk fashion. Yet when it came to Andhra Pradesh he took advantage of every excuse to enable the division of Telugu people. He didn’t even bother to consult the cabinet, the parliament, nor the Andhra Pradesh State Assembly before eagerly and unilaterally announcing the decision to divide the State of Andhra Pradesh.

Chidambaram’s follies are not confined to Andhra Pradesh. Under his leadership Naxals are going on a rampage. Media has been idolizing Chidambaram as a Sardar Patel’s reincarnation. Looks like that got into our Home Minister’s head.

Our Patel wannabe Home Minister started “Operation Green Hunt” on Naxalites. He rolled in Central Reserve Police Force and Commando Battalion for Resolute Action against Naxals. What are the results of his high-profile offensive so far? 25 policemen killed in West Bengal, 76 CRPF and policemen killed in an ambush in Dantewada Chattisgarh, and another 26 CRPF men killed this week in Narayanpur district in Chattisgarh.

Home Minister Chidambaram should learn a lesson or two from late YSR. Andhra Pradesh was one of the worst Naxal affected States in the country. YSR didn’t indulge in any major “operations” or threatened to bring aircrafts to tackle Naxalites. He initiated developmental activities in Naxal infested areas. He strengthened the intelligence network, and empowered the police to do their job. This has effectively halted Naxal menace in the state. YSR didn’t make tall claims, nor held weekly press conferences, nor did he ever celebrate victory over Naxals.

If this is not enough, it is widely believed that the Home Minister played a chief role in the recent conflict between Manipur and Nagaland, wherein Nagas have blocked NH 39 and NH53 access for 65 days. This effectively denied the rest of the North Eastern States basic commodities like fuel, baby food, and medicine. It is widely believed that it is the Home Minister who opened the North East’s pandora’s box.

Home Minister Chidambaram during his brief stint has done enough damage to our nation through his actions. Under his leadership, Andhra Pradesh in the South, Kashmir in the North, and Nagaland, Manipur in the North East have gone up in flames. I hope the leadership of this country will wake up from its slumber and relieve Chidambaram from his public duties.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

When Sri Krishna Deva Raya took to the Vijayanagara throne in 1509, the empire was in a significantly weakened state. The entire coastal Telugu areas were occupied by Orissa. Similarly, the Kannada and Tamil regions have also raised a flag of revolt. 24 year old Sri Krishna Deva Raya was determined to put things in order. He first invaded Mysore (Srirangapatnam) and suppressed the Kannada revolt. He then marched on coastal Telugu region and drove out the Orissa army from Udayagiri, Kondavidu, Kondapalli, and Rajahmundry. After this Krishna Deva Raya marched on Tamil Coromandel coast and subdued that region as well. At the end of these battles, that lasted six long years, he was able to bring back the entire South India under Vijayanaagaram’s suzerainty.

 

While Sri Krishna Deva Raya was busy consolidating his empire, Bahamani Empire of Deccan (Gulbarga) was going through infighting. Sultan Quli, who came to India from Turkey, raised a flag of revolt against Bahamani. He attacked Devarakonda and ended the Velama kingdom’s rule.

 

Learning of the attack on the Velama kingdom, Sri Krishna Deva Raya rushed with his forces to rescue and camped at Panagal in Nalgonda. In a fierce battle that ensued, Sultan Quli defeated Sri Krishna Deva Raya forcing his retreat from Nalgonda.

 

Encouraged by his victory, Sultan Quli marched on Coastal Telugu districts. Sri Krishna Deva Raya learnt his lesson and moved into Coastal Andhra with a massive army and succeeded in driving out Sultan Quli’s forces. As a result, today’s Nizam region was separated from Telugu land and a tenuous peace reigned between Vijayanagaram and Qutub Shah who started ruling from Golkonda.

 

Sultan Quli’s brother Ibrahim was the assumed heir to the Golkonda throne. Ibrahim got into a dispute with his brother. Vijayanagaram, after the premature death of Sri Krishna Deva Raya, was now under the rule of his son-in-law Aliya Rama. Aliya gave a large estate in Vijayanagaram to Ibrahim and provided protection from his brother. After the demise of Sultan Quli, Ibrahim left Vijayanagaram and went on to become the king of Golkonda.

 

Sadly, in the Talikota battle waged to destroy Vijayanagaram in the name of Jihad, Ibrahim became a mute spectator to the spectacle of his friend Aliya Rama’s head getting chopped off by Nizam Shah of Ahmadnagar. Though there are accounts that he was grief-stricken to witness his friend’s killing, he did not stop it.

 

Ibrahim, after the demise of Vijayanagara Empire, started annexing its Telugu districts. In 1571-72 he captured Rajahmundry, in 1579 he captured Vinukonda, Kondavidu, Kacharlakota, and Khammam.

 

Hyderabad city was not founded at this time. After Ibrahim Quli’s death, his son Mohammed Quli continued consolidating his hold on Vijayanagara Telugu regions. Mohammed occupied Kurnool, Cuddapah, Nandial, Dole, Gandikota, and Nellore.

 

Mohammed Quli Qutub Shah completed the consolidation of the Telugu region under Muslim rule. He founded Hyderabad in 1589. At the time of the city’s founding the entire Telugu country, including the current Nizam, Circar, and Ceded regions, was under Qutub Shahs.

 

Mongolian Emperor Aurangazeb intended to consolidate his hold on South India. He attacked Golkonda and captured it in 1687, thus ending the Qutub Shahi rule. He appointed his representative Nizam to administer the Golkonda kingdom.

 

British entered India in 1600 to conduct trade through the East India Company. Inspired by the stupendous financial success of the East India Company, French entered Indian shores in 1650s through the French East India Company. British and French quickly went beyond their original goal of trade and got involved in regional conflicts between Indian kingdoms. British were the best in the world when it came to using gun powder, followed by the French.

 

Nizam Asaf Jah of Hyderabad declared independence from Delhi in 1720. Asaf Jah died in 1748. His sons got into a fight for the Hyderabad throne. British and French sided with different heirs in that power struggle. Both the British and French had their eyes set on the Coastal Telugu districts for maritime trade and military reasons.

 

French helped Nizam’s third son Salabat to capture Hyderabad throne. In return for their generosity, Salabat assigned Coastal districts to the French. British concerned with the growing French influence, under the leadership of Colonel Clive, marched on the Coastal districts in 1759 and occupied the region. As a result, British were officially at war with the Hyderabad State.

 

Seven years later in 1766, British and the Nizam reached an agreement to end hostilities. In return for keeping the Coastal districts, British agreed to pay nine lakh rupees a year to Nizam. As you can see, though Coastal districts were separated from the rest of the Telugu land, the districts were still contributing to Hyderabad exchequer through the taxes paid to the British, which are in turn being passed on to Nizam.

 

The conflict between the British and French continued in the Indian subcontinent. Nizam once again sided with French and invited 15,000 French soldiers to protect Hyderabad. British marched on Hyderabad and drove out the French soldiers. Nizam was forced to accept British protection through a treaty signed in 1798. As a result, six battalions of British forces were placed in Hyderabad. Nizam was required to pay 24 lakh rupees a year for the maintenance of British troops.

 

Nizam could not pay the British these monies and as a result amassed a significant debt. In 1800 he was forced to cede Bellary and Cuddapah to the British in return for the British military expense.

 

So, it is clear that Hyderabad continued to receive British protection with the taxes paid by the Circar and Ceded districts even after these regions separated from the Hyderabad State.

 

Hyderabad State, in addition to the 8 Telugu districts, had 4 Kannada and 3 Maratha districts. There was an atrocious tax regime under Nizam. Peasants of all these districts paid taxes through their nose to Nizam.

 

Today’s Hyderabad city is a source of revenue for the rest of the State. However, prior to 1956, the situation was quite different. The rural areas of the Hyderabad State financed the expenses required to maintain the capital city.

 

Now, with that background, who can stake a claim for Hyderabad city?

 

Our capital city belongs to the people living in erstwhile Nizam Telangana, Maratha, and Kannada districts- particularly the peasants.

 

It belongs to Hyderabadi Muslims including those that came from Iran, Iraq, Turkey and other places.

 

It belongs to the Marathis, Kannadigas, Marwadis, Rajputs, Gujaratis, Punjabis and many others who have been living in Hyderabad city for many generations.

 

Lastly, it belongs to the people of Circar and Ceded districts. As separatists call them, these people are not “settlers” but are rightful stakeholders of the Hyderabad city. Just like the poor peasants of the Nizam districts, their forefathers have also contributed to the development of Hyderabad city by paying taxes to the Qutub Shahs, the Nizams and the British.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

 

Monday, April 19th, 2010

Many of you have asked for my submission to the Srikrishna Committee. I have collaborated with the APNRI organization to prepare the report. We have released the report to the public at an event organized in New Jersey.

 

Please click on the link below to view the report:

Main section: http://www.myteluguroots.com/PDF/APNRI_SKC_Main.pdf

Appendix: http://www.myteluguroots.com/PDF/APNRI_SKC_Appendix.pdf

 

I am also including the text of the press release that has been sent to the media organizations.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

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http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

 

=====================================

 

Andhra Pradesh Non-Resident Indians Rejected Division of the State

Subject: Srikrishna Committee Submission Press Release

Date: April 18th, 2010

Andhra Pradesh Non-Resident Indians, in their Srikrishna Committee submission have strenuously argued against division of the State. In an event organized to release the submission to the media organizations and public, NRIs presented compelling statistical evidence to debunk the myth of underdevelopment in the Telangana region. NRIs presented data from 1956 and 2008 on several economic sectors including education, irrigation, industries, employment, agriculture output, roads, and hospitals. In each of these sectors, they have compared development across all three regions and have argued that there is no evidence of deliberate discrimination.

APNRIs have said that Telangana was home to some of the greatest empires that united Telugu people. Members of the organization have expressed sadness with the way separatists are distorting the region’s history and culture to fit their agenda of division.

The details of APNRI’s Srikrishna Committee submission were released at a press meeting held on April 19, 2010 at Radisson Convention Center in Piscataway, New Jersey, USA. The event was attended by various Indian media outlets, including supporters for United Andhra Pradesh.

APNRI’s submission to the Srikrishna Committee was structured into four main themes: a long legacy of Telugu people living together in harmony, analysis of the progress and economic development in the three regions of the state since 1956, impact of the current developments in Andhra Pradesh on non-resident Indians, and a strong case for why the state of Andhra Pradesh should not be divided.

APNRI Forum has been working with political and media establishments in Andhra Pradesh to promote the United Andhra Pradesh cause.  As part of this effort, APNRI forum has been organizing “Meet the Leader” conference calls with the leaders and elected representatives of the State. Some of the prominent speakers that attended these calls were Sri Lagadapati Rajagopal, Sri Mandali Budhaprasad, Sri Jayaprakash Narayan, Sri, Thammineni Veerabadram, Sri Payyavula Kesav, and Sri B.V. Raghavulu.

Following its release of the Srikrishna Committee submission, APNRI is embarking on an aggressive campaign for preservation of the geographical integrity of the State of Andhra Pradesh. APNRI is planning to widely distribute its submission to media, public representatives, and general public. APNRI members are planning to meet the Srikrishna Committee to present their case in person. In addition, the organization is planning to engage the media organizations for a much broader coverage of the Samaikya Andhra Pradesh movement.

About APNRI (http://www.andhrapradeshnri.org ):

APNRI was formed by the non-resident Telugu Indians living in the United States and Canada. The organization is represented by the members from the Coastal Andhra, Rayalaseema, and Telangana regions. This is the national-level umbrella organization representing several state level organizations striving for a united Andhra Pradesh state.

The mission of the organization is to promote unity and harmony among Telugu people of all regions and to preserve the geographic integrity of the state of Andhra Pradesh.

APNRI submission can be obtained at: http://www.andhrapradeshnri.org/report.html

 

Friday, April 16th, 2010
Saturday, April 10th, 2010

Separatists have been telling their supporters that other regions have been looting lakhs of government jobs in violation of the Six Point Formula. During a recent interview with Jayaprakash Narayan, one of the caller to the program claimed that 3 lakh government jobs have been stolen from the Nizam region.

 

Before we go into the analysis, allow me to set-up the stage for those who are not up to speed on the Six Point Formula and GO-610.

 

Six Point Formula is the solution proposed by Smt. Indira Gandhi in 1973, in order to end the separatist movement in the Kosta-Seema regions in opposition to the mulki rules. Smt. Gandhi’s solution was accepted by the leaders of all regions. As per this solution, the state was divided into 6 zones. Zone-I has Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, and Visakhapatnam districts. Zone-II has East Godavari, West Godavari, and Krishna districts. Zone-III has Guntur, Prakasam, and Nellore districts. Zone-IV has Chittoor, Cuddapah, Ananthapur, and Kurnool districts. Zone-V has Adilabad, Karimnagar, Warangal, and Khammam districts. Zone-VI has Hyderabad, Rangareddy, Nizamabad, Mahboobnagar, Medak, and Nalgonda districts.

 

In each zone 70% of non-gazetted, and 60% of gazetted posts were reserved for locals. In addition, 80% of class-IV posts were reserved to locals of the district. Certain exceptions were made to Hyderabad city for state level organizations allowing people from all regions to work in these offices.

 

Government Order 610 was issued in 1985 by the TDP government of Sri N.T. Ramarao, to correct the irregularities that have occurred in the implementation of the Six Point Formula.

 

When we examine the violations to the Six Point Formula they should be studied across all the zones for the sake of completeness. For example, if there are violations made in teacher postings, it is not correct to just look at violations in Zone V and Zone VI, but one should look at violations in all the zones.

 

With that background, now let us look at some of the violations that have occurred in government job appointments. I examined this issue by relying on publicly available sources. I chiefly relied on the Second Interim Report of the House Committee on G.O. 610 as well as the information available on the government website go610.ap.gov.in.

 

According to the House Committee report, the total number of employees in the State government and local bodies is 674,665. Of these employees, 583,026 come under the purview of Six Point Formula.

 

Let us look at violations in the Hyderabad City police appointments as well as violations in teacher appointments across the state. I chose these two categories as the data is available at the district level.

 

According to the presidential order on Six Point Formula, the police recruitment for Hyderabad city does not fall under the zonal system. Therefore, people from all regions have been recruited into city police. However, the House Committee recognized Hyderabad as a local zone and applied 80% local rule. As a result, it found that out of 4,722 police constables, 3,344 are non-locals. In the separatists’ lingo these violators are popularly known as the “job looters”.

 

So let us dig a little deeper to see who these looters are.

 

The House Committee report identified these violators by district. When these violations are aggregated by region, 1615 (50%) of the violators came from the Nizam region, 1212 (38%) came from the Kosta region, 395 (12%) of the violators came from the Rayalaseema region. In other words, the highest number of violators came from the Nizam region.

 

Now let us look at another set of violators. These are teacher posting violations that happened across the entire State. The government forcefully repatriated these people to their home districts and here is how the numbers look when aggregated by region.

 

About 2,600 teachers were found in violation of Six Point Formula, across the state. Below table gives the breakdown of these violators by region.

 

GO610_Violators

 

It may be a little confusing to interpret the matrix, so please allow me to paint the picture.

 

In the Nizam Telangana districts, a total 992 teachers, were found in violation of the Six Point Formula and have been repatriated to their home districts. Out of these 992 teachers, 541 violators came from the Nizam region itself. For example, in Nalgonda there were 71 teachers who were non-locals. Of these 71 teachers, 10 came from Warangal, 3 came from Karimnagar, 1 from Mahabubnagar, 1 from Adilabad, 8 from Hyderabad, 1 from Medak, 2 from Nizamabad, 13 from Khammam. The remaining violators came from Kosta and Seema. Overall, of the 992 violators in the Nizam region, 311 came from Kosta and 58 came from Rayalaseema.

 

Similarly there were 1100 violators in Kosta and 825 of them came from the Kosta districts. 110 violators came from the Nizam region and 147 from Rayalaseema.

 

Along the same lines, there were 345 repatriations in the Seema. Out of these, 193 violators came from Rayalaseema itself, while 112 came from Kosta and 27 from the Nizam region.

 

So, who are the worst victims of this nonsensical Six Point Formula, which plays the chief role of further exacerbating the differences among Telugu people? A majority of the victims come from their native regions and these forced repatriations make them feel like they are aliens in their own land.

 

So, what conclusions can we can draw from what we saw so far?

 

Yes, violations to the Six Point Formula have happened. However, these violations have happened across all the regions and a majority of these violators come from their native regions. Number of violations in the Nizam Telangana could possibly be a bit higher than the other two regions of the state. However, the extent of these violations is nowhere close to the mass hysteria that is being created by the separatists over government jobs. As usual, the separatist modus-operandi is to incite people by cherry-picking the violations that occurred in the Nizam Telangana region and conveniently forgetting to mention to their constituents that similar violations have occurred in the other regions too.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

 

===========================================

 

Links to:

GO 610 House Committee Report

Data I extracted from the pdfs on the go610 government web-site

GO 610

Six Point Formula

 

Section 18.1.9 of Girglani report said (scanned copy of the excerpt given below): "In the various representations to the government and in the Press a figure ranging 40,000 to 58,000 of non-locals working in zones V and VI is being given as those who are working in violation of Presidential Order. The statistical part of non-locals and locals has been examined by the Commission and it will be seen that the percentage of non-locals in the zones V and VI is negligible and far below the sealing of 20 percent. Therefore on statistical aspect there is no question of any action or implementation of the G.O." 

 

Girglani_Important_Note

 

 

 

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Monday, March 29th, 2010

Here is my conversation with TV9's Pratyusha. This discussion has occurred after the Pustaka Parichayam program that was broadcast on TV9 this weekend.

 

I am trying to get the video of Pustaka Parichayam program. If it is available on a public site, please pass it on to me as I would like to provide a response to Professor Manohar's allegations.

 

Here is the link to my conversation with Pratyusha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLdjdS8Reh0

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

I would like to present more statistics on the state of Nizam Telangana, Coastal Andhra, and Rayalaseema regions. The data does not include education and irrigation as I’ve already published this data on my web-site at http://www.myteluguroots.com/tables.html.

 

I am not going to provide detailed commentary on the data, as the tables are self-explanatory in nature. 

 

Here is the gist:

 

In the categories of total workers, government hospitals, primary health centers, livestock, factory employment, power consumption, roads, school and degree education Nizam region performs better.

 

In the categories of number of beds in the government hospitals, number of vehicles it falls behind.

 

In the categories of total agriculture output, and poultry Nizam Telangana is comparable to the other regions.

 

Per-capita income is a good gauge to assess the economic well-being of a region. When summarized by region, Kosta per-capita income is Rs. 28,133, Nizam Telangana is Rs. 26,528, and Rayalaseema is Rs. 20,804. When Hyderabad and Rangareddi districts are excluded from Nizam Telangana, per-capita income drops to Rs. 24,168.

 

Based on per-capita income, clearly Nizam Telangana is behind Coastal Andhra and ahead of Rayalaseema. However, this difference is not enough to justify the kind of wild and inflammatory exaggerations being made by the separatists to further their agenda of hate. The backwardness of the Nizam Telangana region can be partly attributed to the feudal rule under Nizam. If one were to look at the absolute growth, Nizam Telangana region has grown more than the other two regions, since the state formation.

 

But here is a more important observation. Separatists mislead their supporters claiming that “self-rule” will change the face of the Nizam Telangana region. Ironically, Rayalaseema, from where 7 of the 15 chief ministers of our state hailed from, continues to be the most backward of the three regions.

 

Workers

 

FactoryEmployment

 

AgricultureOutput

 

Livestock

 

Vehicles

 

Roads

 

Power

 

MedicalFacilities

 

PerCapitaIncome

 

 

 

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Sunday, February 28th, 2010

Mallik Garu sent me Chapters 22 and 23 of Late Sri K. V. Ranga Reddy’s recently published autobiography in English language. As soon as I read the excerpts, I could not resist but write this quick note. Here is another classic case of hate-mongering being indulged by the separatists.

K.V. Ranga Reddy was the first Deputy Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh and the current Rangareddi district was named after him. He was also a signatory of the Gentlemen's agreement.

Sri Ranga Reddy titled his book “An Autobiography” when he published it in 1967. His book has been renamed by the separatists, in their infinite wisdom, to: “From the Struggle and the Betrayal: The Telangana Story”.

I doubt if there is any precedence to changing an author’s book title after his death. This is even more profound considering that this is an autobiography- which is a book of very personal nature written by an author about himself.

If this is not enough, the separatists have inserted a brand new Chapter-23 to the autobiography a full 40 years after Sri Ranga Reddy’s death. I am sure you can guess the nature of the title by now: “Origins of Telangana discontent – Telangana agitation”. The translator claims that Chapter-23 was constructed based on the notes left by Ranga Reddy before his death in 1970. Interestingly, K.V. Ranga Reddy said he could not write his autobiography due to his poor eye sight and hence he dictated his autobiography to Sri Subba Rao, a relative of Andhra Pitamaha.

K.V. Ranga Reddy in 1967 wrote: “Had I given this to any other writer, I was afraid he would make it more ornamental and flowery, which was not my intention. Because of my poor eye sight, I dictated the information in a fact by fact manner, without any exaggeration, to my friend Sri Kommavarapu Subba Rao. My word and his pen flowed smoothly from the beginning to the end. Sri Subba Rao ensured there were no errors of language“

So how would K.V. Ranga Reddy, who was so keen about accurate representation of his views, if he were alive, feel about changing the title of his autobiography and blatant insertion of a new chapter to the book?

I found a couple more fascinating aspects in the two chapters.

Separatists have been extensively citing Lucien D. Benichou’s book Appendex 12 where it is written: “The ‘Gentlemen’s Agreement was violated in 1956 itself when Sanjiva Reddy, the first Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh refused to name any Telangana minister as Deputy Chief Minister saying that the Deputy Chief Ministership is like the unwanted sixth finger of the hand.”

Reading the excerpts of autobiography I was surprised to learn that it is in fact Sri Ranga Reddy, when asked by press correspondents why he was not given the Deputy CM said: “What is there in Deputy Chief Ministership, more than what I have now? It is like ‘angushth-e-sheshum’ (sixth finger).”

When Ranga Reddy said “more than what I have now”, he was referring to the powerful cabinet portfolios he was holding including Home, Revenue, and Prohibition.

Let me say this in unambiguous terms- not creating the Deputy Chief Minister position was a blatant violation of Gentlemen’s agreement. However, there seems to be behind the screens consensus, as there was no major outcry by the Nizam leaders against the violation of the agreement. The issue of Deputy CM was rectified starting 1960 when Sri K.V. Ranga Reddy became the Deputy CM under Sri Damodaram Sanjeevaiah, J.V. Narasing Rao under Kasu Brahmananda Reddy, and B.V. Subba Reddy under P.V. Narasimha Rao. The Deputy Chief Minister requirement became void with Indira Gandhi’s six-point formula of 1973.

In conclusion, I found Chapter 22 more interesting as it clearly explains the healthy working relationship between the #2 man in the cabinet K.V. Ranga Reddy and the #1 man N. Sanjiva Reddy. It provides insights into the decision making process between Ranga Reddy and Sanjiva Reddy, wherein over 75% of the recommendations made by the former were approved by the latter.

K.V. Ranga Reddy was keen on not making his autobiography ornamental and flowery and wanted to avoid all exaggerations. Sadly, the separatists have blatantly flouted the wishes of Sri Ranga Reddy in order to further their agenda of hate.

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

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http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, February 26th, 2010

Earlier I posted only Part-1 of my interview with Professor Venigalla. Now, all three parts of the interview are available on his web-site.

 

This is an inspirational and informative interview for all Telugu people who believe in our unity.

 

Please listen to the interview and share it with your friends and family.

 

As always, I am grateful to you for your support for this monumental cause.

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-1-of-3

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-2-of-3

 

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-3-of-3

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Separatist leaders and intellectuals often claim that people’s desire for a separate Nizam Telangana state is over 50 years. These claims being made by the separatists are untrue. To the contrary, it is the vast majority of Telugu people’s desire for Vishalandhra that is over 50 years old.

 

The movement for a Telugu state started in 1903-04 with the formation of Young Men’s Literary Association in Guntur. This association developed a map of Andhradesa that included Telugu-speaking provinces of Madras Presidency, Central Provinces, Nizam dominions, and the Mysore state.

 

In 1912, when Congress Party leaders held their 21st Krishna-Guntur district conference, members of the literary association proposed: “…to agitate first for the formation of a province for the Andhras comprising the coastal and Ceded districts and that later they could add the five contiguous eastern Telugu districts in the Nizam’s dominions and the Telugu-speaking areas in the Central Provinces.”

 

As a result of these efforts, the “Father of the Andhra Movement” Sri Konda Venkatapayya undertook the task of leading the movement for a separate state. Andhra Mahasabha was born as a result of these grassroots efforts. The organization held its first meeting in Bapatla in 1913. In addition to 2000 visitors, 800 delegates from Kosta, Seema, Nagpur, Warangal, and Hyderabad attended the conference.

 

The struggle for a Telugu state went on for a couple of decades. The organization was able to convince Gandhiji to agree in principle to the formation of a Telugu state. They even sent delegations to London to make a case for Telugu province.

 

In March 1936, on Ugadi, Vishalandhra proponents carried a map of Andhrarashtramu in a procession through the streets of Bezawada. The map consisted of the Telugu-speaking areas of the Madras presidency, Orissa, Mysore, and Hyderabad. Hundreds of people gathered on the banks of the Krishna River and took a pledge to achieve an Andhra province.

 

Sataavadhaanulu Srinivasa Sodarulu compiled a book titled “Andhra Raashtramu” in 1940. Given below are a couple of poems from 1940, 16 years before a united Telugu state formed. The writers’ affinity for Telugus living in all the regions, including the Madras presidency, Hyderabad state, and Orissa, becomes clear from these poems.

 

After India achieved independence there was intense lobbying by Telugus for an Andhra state. Government appointed Dar commission to sort out the issue and it recommended against linguistic provinces.

 

On August 15, 1949, Father of the Andhra Movement, Konda Venkatapayya died without realizing his dream for a Telugu state.

 

Then the JVP committee was formed- made up of Jawaharlal Nehru, Vallabhai Patel, and Dr. Pattabhi Sitaramayya. These efforts failed too, as the issue of Madras became contentious. Telugus claimed their right to Madras city as it historically belonged to them and the region was given to the British by the erstwhile Vijayanagara kings who ruled from Chandragiri after the empire’s downfall.

 

In January 1950, APCC general body met at Madras and passed a resolution demanding Madras be the temporary capital of Andhra province and upon creation of Vishalandhra, Hyderabad become the permanent capital.

 

Swami Sitaram, a Congress Party worker who became a Saadhu, took up the cause that Venkatapayya fought for decades. He started his fast unto death on August 16, 1951. 35 days into Swami Sitaram’s fast, Vinoba Bhave intervened and convinced Sitaram to give up his fast and promised to reason with Nehru. However, Bhave failed to impress upon Nehru for the formation of a Telugu state.

 

Potti Sriramulu consulted Swami Sitaram and obtained permission to start his fast until death. After 57 days of fasting Potti Sriramulu passed away. Following Amarajeevi’s death there was widespread violence and Nehru agreed to the formation of the Andhra state. Telugus' claim to Madras was denied by Nehru, given Rajaji’s intense lobbying.

 

Telangana separatists often cite an article written by Sri M. Narayan Reddy, former M.P. from Nizamabad where he referenced Potti Sriramulu’s letters about the status of Madras and claims that Potti Sriramulu fast was just to win Madras for Telugus.

 

Yes, Madras was a contentious issue at that time. However, Sri Narayan Reddy looked through a narrow prism to reach his conclusions. He ignored 50 years of Telugus’ struggles for a state, which culminated in the death of Potti Sriramulu.

 

Now, let’s switch gears and quickly look at Nizam Telangana.

 

Peasants of Nizam Telangana rose up against the feudal system and shook up the foundation of the Hyderabad state. Following Police Action initiated by the Indian government, Hyderabad state became free of Nizam’s atrocious rule.

 

Nehru publicly expressed disinterest for Vishalandhra accusing Telugus of having imperialistic tendencies. He appointed Fazal Ali commission to make a recommendation on the future of Hyderabad state’s constitution. As expected, Fazal Ali toed Nehru’s line and recommended keeping Nizam Telangana region as a separate state for 5 years.

 

The elected representatives of the Nizam Telangana region rose up against the irrational recommendation made by Fazal Ali. Legislators of the Hyderabad state met and debated the issue for a week in the Assembly. Under the leadership of Burugula Ramakrishna Rao, they discussed a resolution favoring the creation of Vishalandhra. Out of 174 representatives in the Assembly, 103 favored Vishalandhra, 29 favored a Telangana state, whereas 15 remained neutral. If one just takes people’s representatives from the Nizam Telangana region, 59 favored Vishalandhra, whereas 25 favored Telangana, and 1 remained neutral.

 

Clearly, there is overwhelming evidence that Telugus across Nizam, Kosta, and Seema wanted to be part of Andhra Pradesh. This desire existed ever since the Young Men’s Literary Association was formed in A.D. 1904. At the time of the formation of Andhra Pradesh state an overwhelming 70% of the people’s representatives from Nizam Telangana supported Vishalandhra.

 

So, how can the separatists claim that Telugu people from the Nizam region wanted a separate state for over 50 years?

 

 Poem-1

 

Poem-2

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Monday, February 15th, 2010

Professor Mohan Venigalla is a professor at George Mason University and has been doing his online radio show "Mohana Muralee GaanaLahari" for three years. On the eve of the 3rd anniversary of his show, I participated in his program. Here is the audio of the first of the 3-part interview.  If you visit his telugloble website, you will also find a blog I posted on teenage unemployment (not related to the crisis in our state)

I will post the rest of the links to the program as Mohan garu makes them available.

http://www.teluglobe.com/podcasts/mm-gaanalahari/mmgl-interviews/who-are-we-as-telugu-people-nalamotu-chakravarthy-1-of-3

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Saturday, February 13th, 2010

1) What is the source of 33 crore rupees shown as balance of funds?

 

I've scanned the copy of the news paper I have from from June 16th 1968:

http://www.myteluguroots.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/33-Crores-2.jpg (please download and view it in an image editor for better resolution)
 

33 Crores Balance of Funds

 

2) Investments in Hyderabad from other regions
 

This should be welcomed. Every developed country welcomes those that want to establish businesses in their cities/states with open arms. Even A.P. welcomes investments from other states and countries.
 

3) Discrimination in irrigation projects
 

The most controversial aspect of the current separatist movement is canal irrigation. Despite the tens of thousands of crores that government invested in this area, since the formation of the state, our government succeeded in adding a mere 3.3 lakh hectares to canal irrigation as of 2006-07. Of these 3.3 lakh hectares, 1.6 lakh hectares are in Nizam Telangana, 1.3 in Kosta, and 39 thousand hectares in Seema. Now, compare that with the 14 lakh hectares brought under irrigation using tube-wells. Please note that I am not talking about ayacut area, as that does not mean much, because we can build all the canals we want, but if there is no water they are useless. We have a canal going through our lands in Nalgonda and we haven't seen a drop of water in it till today. I am talking about actual area under canal irrigation as published in the Statistical Abstract published by the government.

We can argue till the cows come home about how projects are favoring one region or the other. Bottom line, government failure in implementing projects is across the regions and the data does not support that one region was neglected at the expense of other. Also, the current separatist movement precedes Jalayagnam when TRS aligned with the Congress.

Lastly, I personally am not in favor of Polavaram as I think the investment doesn’t justify the returns it will yield. A large number of people are being displaced due to Polavaram. Also, there are credible scientists arguing that it will have the same silt problem that Sriramsagar is having- which is typical to Godavari basin. Lastly, if we build Polavaram, we will lose some of the Krishna water to other states as per Bachawat ruling.

If there is one lesson we can learn from 5 decades of mis-investments into irrigation, mega irrigation projects are a colossal failure in terms of return on investment. The best mode of irrigation is tanks and unfortunately they continue to deteriorate by day.
 

4) "Because, both the major rivers krishna and godavari flow through telangana, the region has the right to first utlize its share of water. This is the rule everywhere in the world".

 

No, this NOT an international norm. If Karnataka and Maharashtra adopt this logic, they can use all the river waters they want. Bachawat did extensive study on this subject. He studied both the American and the International models. The internationally accepted rule is “protection of existing uses”. In other words, if there is a project already built, you cannot take water from that project and give it to other projects. Karnataka has 43.7% of the Krsihna river catchment area, while our state has 29.4%. Despite it, Bachawat awarded 700 TMC to Karnataka and 800 TMC to Andhra Pradesh.

 

5) Potti Sriramulu
 

Amarajeevi’s fast was not for Madras. His death was the culmination of 50 years of Telugu’s struggle for a state. I delved into this in my book. Yes, people during his funeral shouted “Madras Manade’, but that is looking at the history through a narrow prism.
 

6) Raavi Narayan Reddy, Komaram Bheem and other legendaries not in history books
 

Rudrama Devi is a Telangana icon and can be found in all history books. I remember reading about Andhra Pitamaha Madapati Hanumanth Rao, Suravaram Pratap Reddy, Sarojani Naidu and others when in school. I haven't seen an objective study showing discrimination by region in history books. If that in fact is the case, let’s fight for it- separate state is not the solution. I personally am very fond of Raavi Narayan Reddy and believe that he should be cited prominently in our school books.

 

 “Veera Telangana Naadhi, Veru Telangana Kaadhu”
- Raavi Narayan Reddy

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

For the education statistics I’ve published for the three regions of Coastal Andhra, Rayalaseema, and Nizam Telangana, many have claimed that the numbers are misleading. The chief claim is that the numbers include public and private education. The separatists have argued that Nizam Telangana was discriminated when it came to government expenditure on public schooling.

 

I have done a quick analysis on primary and high schools and the results were revealing to say the least.

 

The data for the below given analysis was sourced from the Statistical Abstract of Andhra Pradesh 2007. I have used 2001 population numbers to normalize student population.

 

Government aided schools are made up of: Central Government, State Government, Zilla Parishad, Municipal, and Aided Schools.

 

Let us start our analysis with primary school students in government aided schools.

 

 

 

As you can see, the numbers speak for themselves. There are more students supported by the government in the Nizam Telangana region than in the other regions. I urge my Kosta and Seema brethren to not make too much noise about it, as the difference is fairly negligible. I think the important note all of us should make is that there is no apparent discrimination across regions.

 

Then some have made the argument that there are fewer teachers per student in the Nizam Telangana. So, let’s look at the numbers:

 

 

The number of teachers indeed is fewer in the Nizam Telangana region. However, the difference is not significant. So, I urge my Nizam Telangana brethren to exercise restraint and wait till we get to the high school student numbers. Again, let me underscore that there is no visible discrimination between regions.

 

Now, let’s move on to the category of government aided High Schools:

 

 

In this category Nizam Telangana leads other regions. In fact, the numbers get better when Hyderabad and Rangareddi are eliminated. That is partly because of more emphasis on private education in Hyderabad and Rangareddi districts.

 

Now let us look at the number of teachers situation:

Again Nizam Telangana leads in the number of teachers category in all combinations. There are 12 government aided teachers for every 10000 people in Nizam, compared to 10.8 in Kosta and 10.7 in Seema.

 

In conclusion, the above data clearly shows that there is no evidence whatsoever of discrimination against Nizam Telangana. When the state came into existence, thanks to Nizam’s atrocious rule, education in Nizam Telangana was in shambles. We’ve made significant strides since then.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Professor Kodandaram is the Convener of the Joint Action Committee that is spearheading the current separatist movement. In his article titled “Telangana Marginalised” he claims that in Nizam’s Hyderabad state, the Telangana region was doing well in agriculture and industrial development. He further claims that the growth was disrupted after Telugus united in the form of Andhra Pradesh state. The most heinous statement that the Professor makes is that Nizam Telangana has become an internal colony after the formation of the state.

 

The undeniable truth is that we were a colony under Nizam who sucked the blood out of poor peasants. Four thousand men and women who lost their lives fighting Nizam are the reminders of that atrocious rule.

 

Sri Raavi Narayana Reddy, was one of the prominent leaders who led the peasants against Nizam. According to Sri Reddy, taxation in the Hyderabad state was 25% to 300% more than in other areas of the country. Peasants were required to pay a fixed tax called a levy, which they had to pay regardless of the output derived from the farmland. If there was a dispute between two people, before it could be settled, they had to pay a “dispute tax.” If a family member died, you could not cremate that person unless you paid the “ash tax.” Then, there was a war tax to finance the British in World War II. There were over 26 different kinds of taxes in enforcement.

 

If this oppressive taxation was not enough, there was the system of vetti which was a form of slavery. Vetti wreaked havoc on the people of Nizam Telangana. Sri Puchalapally Sundarayya, who hailed from Kosta and fought for the peasants of Nizam Telangana, wrote:  “The vetti system had made the life of the Telangana people one of utter degradation and of abject serfdom. It had ruined man’s self-respect completely….”

 

Sadly, Professor Kodandaram does not mind demonizing his fellow Telugus, yet he shows no hesitation to sugar-coat Nizam’s rule by saying that the region was doing well in agriculture and industrial development.

 

Let’s move on to the statistical data that the Professor offers as evidence of “colonization” of Nizam Telangana.

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “The irrigation policies illustrate the discrimination against Telangana…AP gave high priority to irrigation… As a consequence net irrigated area increased from 27.47 lakh hectares to 55 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-02.

 

The gross area under irrigation in our state in 1956 was 32 lakh hectares. As of 2005-2006, that number stands at 60 lakh hectares. In other words, we brought 28 additional lakh hectares under irrigation. Out of these 28 lakh hectares, 15 lakhs are in the Nizam Telangana area, 10 lakh hectares in the Kosta area, and 3 lakh hectares in the Rayalaseema area.

 

Is this what Professor Kodandaram offers as evidence of discrimination?

 

Professor Kodandaram further wrote: “A lion’s share, 90 per cent, in the public expenditure on irrigation was allocated for major and medium irrigation and minor irrigation received only 10 per cent of the allocation. This policy has resulted in the decline of the minor irrigation particularly tank irrigation and consequently the net area under tank irrigation declined from 10.68 lakh hectares to 5.67 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-02. In contrast the net area irrigated by canals has gone up from 12.92 lakh hectares to 15 lakh hectares between 1955-56 and 2001-2002. The deterioration of the tank irrigation system has an adverse affect on Telangana more than the other regions because tanks have been the backbone of Telangana agriculture. Further, the loss of the area under the tank irrigation has not been compensated by allocation of river waters.

 

Let us look at Canal irrigation first. In 1956, when the united state came into existence, we had 12.9 lakh hectares under canal irrigation. Despite all the government investments into canal irrigation, as of 2005-06 that number stands at 15.7 lakh hectares. In other words, we brought an additional 2.8 lakh hectares of land under canal irrigation. Of these 2.8 lakh hectares, 1.5 lakh hectares are in the Nizam Telangana area, about 70 thousand hectares in Kosta, and about 60 thousand hectares in Rayalaseema.

 

Is this what Professor Kodandaram offers as evidence of colonization?

 

Professor Kodandaram’s argument about abject neglect of tanks in the Nizam Telangana region and how farmers are relying on bore-wells are valid. However, let us not forget that the losses to the Rayalaseema region in tank irrigation are much steeper than Nizam Telangana. Ironically, half our state’s chief ministers hailed from Rayalaseema.

 

In 1956 Nizam Telangana had 4.5 lakh hectares under tank irrigation, and as of 2005-06 that stands at 2.5 lakh hectares, a 43% drop. In Rayalaseema at the time of state formation 1.6 lakh hectares were under tank irrigation and as of 2005-06, mere 81,000 acres is under tank irrigation- a drop of over 50%. So, were the chief ministers hailing from Rayalaseema discriminating against their own region?

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “Nearly 60 per cent of the net area irrigated under canals is located in these four districts and the balance 40 per cent is shared by the other 18 districts.

 

The Professor conveniently forgets to mention one important fact. These four Kosta districts had all that area under canal irrigation for nearly 100 years before our state even came into existence. That is because of the Dowleswaram and Krishna barrages built by Sir Arthur Cotton. Those Kosta districts did not get canal irrigation at the expense of Rayalaseema or Nizam Telangana. However, Professor Kodandaram wants his followers to believe that it was done at the expense of other regions.

 

Professor Kodandaram wrote: “If the (Gentlemen’s) agreement were to be seriously implemented all the schemes proposed by the Hyderabad Government too would have been constructed to divert nearly 1,000 tmcs of Krishna and Godavari water to irrigate the fields in the region. Today, on record, Telangana gets a mere 277 tmc of water, which is far less in reality. If the Jalyagnam is implemented Telangana will lose its share in the river water permanently. The same situation prevails in the other sector too.

 

There is no verbiage in the Gentlemen’s agreement that indicates Nizam Telangana would get 1000 TMC of water. Lastly to Jalayagnam- doesn’t irrigation minister Ponnala Lakshmaiah hail from Warangal district? Does Professor Kodandaram think that the well-educated and well-respected minister from Nizam Telangana would work against the interests of his own region? As of 2006-07, under Jalayagnam, Rs. 6,801 crore (54.84%) were expended on Nizam Telangana, Rs. 2,931 crore (24.38%) on Kosta, and Rs. 2,289 (19.02%) on Rayalaseema.

 

In conclusion, we in Nizam Telangana should fight for every rightful drop of Krishna and Godavari River waters that have been allocated to us by Bachawat. Our leadership should focus on improving the tank irrigation and at the very least restore it to where it was 50-100 years ago. We don’t need a separate state to achieve these goals. We need leadership that is committed to serving the people. Sadly this is not a top priority for the separatist leaders, as they are busy pitting one region against another.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Some of the bloggers and my close friends raised objections for giving credit to Nizam Andhra Mahasabha for organizing the armed resistance against Nizam. One of the bloggers even claimed that I was re-writing history. The confusion on this subject probably stems from the exact same name used by two very different organizations.

 

The organization that represented Telugus’ interests in Kosta and Seema was “Andhra Mahasabha”. Whereas, the organization that represented Telugus interests in Nizam Telangana was “Nizam Andhra Mahasabha”.

 

Andhra Mahasabha of Kosta-Seema convened for the first time in the year 1913 in Bapatla. About 2000 visitors and 800 delegates attended this conference. In addition to Kosta and Seema delegates, there was representation from Nagpur, Warangal, and Hyderabad. Andhra Mahasabha was closely affiliated with the Congress Party. When the Quit India movement took off in 1943, the organization was banned by the British government.

 

Now to Nizam Andhra Mahasabha. The organization held its first conference in 1930 and was led by none other than the great historian Suravaram Pratap Reddy. Other leaders that led the organization in the later years included Andhra Pitamaha Madapati Hanumanth Rao and Raavi Narayana Reddy. In 1941, under the leadership of Raavi Narayana Reddy, Nizam Andhra Mahasabha changed its strategy and decided to face Nizam’s atrocities aggressively. As a result, moderate members of Nizam Andhra Mahasabha left the organization in 1944. From this point on, communists dominated Nizam Andhra Mahasabha and led the peasants towards an armed uprising against Nizam.

 

No, I was not re-writing history when I mentioned Nizam Andhra Mahasabha as the organization that led the fight against Nizam. I was merely stating a historic fact.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010

Separate state proponents often gripe about the name of our state as some sort of a conspiracy. So, let us peek into our history to understand how our state got its name- Andhra Pradesh.

 

Our tribe was originally called the Andhras and the term Telugu came much later. Some of the early mentions of Andhras were found in the Aitareya Brahmana of 600 BC. Whereas, the early references to Telugus were found many centuries later in the Puri inscription of the Indra Verma of Gangas.

 

Andhra and Telangana interchangeably represent the same region and sect of people i.e., those living in the state of Andhra Pradesh.

 

In the Kakatiya Empire, Telangana represented the current geography of Andhra Pradesh and bordering areas.

 

Nizam for some time ruled the entire geography of the current Andhra Pradesh, as well as parts of today’s Karnataka and Maharashtra. Under Nizam, Telugu region was called Telangana.

 

In 1800’s, French and British had their eyes set on Telangana’s coastline for defense and maritime reasons. When Nizam Asaf Jah died, his sons got into a bitter fight for the Hyderabad throne. By taking sides with the feuding princes, French got hold of Coastal Telangana i.e., today’s Kosta or Coastal Andhra. Later on, the British wrestled Coastal Telangana out of French hands.

 

Ironically, as recently as 60 years ago, Telugus living in Nizam Telangana used to passionately identify themselves as the Andhras. When Telugus living under Nizam established libraries in their region, they called them Andhra Bhaasha Nilayamulu.

 

One of the oldest non-government libraries in Nizam Telangana was established in 1901, in Ramkoti, Hyderabad and was named Sri Krishnadevaraya Andhra Bhasha Nilayam. This library later became a hub for cultural and political activity for Telugus suffering under Nizam rule. Similarly, when Telugus living in the Telangana heartland Warangal wanted to establish a library in the early 1900s, they named it Raja Raja Narendra Andhra Bhasha Nilayam. Again, in 1923, another library established in Hyderabad was called Vemana Andhra Bhasha Nilayam.

 

Telugus living under Nizam faced atrocious discrimination. Urdu and Maratha were the dominant languages while Telugu language was often ridiculed as “Telangi Bedhanghi”.

 

In 1921, in the Hyderabad’s Vivekavardhani Theater, a public meeting was held. All the speakers spoke in Urdu or Maratha. When it was the turn of high court lawyer Allampalli Venkatarama Rao, he got up and spoke in Telugu. Participants in the meeting protested to him speaking in his mother tongue and shouted down his speech.

 

This incident was the starting point for Telugus rising up against Nizam. Telugu men left this meeting in frustration and formed an organization called Andhra Jana Sangham- yes, not Telugu Jana Sangham not Telangana Jana Sangham, but Andhra Jana Sangham.

 

Andhra Jana Sangham later changed its name to Andhra Mahasabha. To differentiate itself from the Kosta organization carrying the same name, it was called the Nizam Andhra Mahasabha or NAMS.

 

Nizam was troubled with the use of Andhra in all the organizations and institutions that Telugus in Nizam Telangana were forming. He suspected Hyderabad state Telugus of having an ulterior motive to merge with their Kosta and Seema brethren in the neighboring Madras Presidency.

 

Once, Nizam’s emissary and close confidant, Nawab Aliyar Zang, approached Andhra Pitamaha Madapati Hanumanth Rao and said: “…it came to our government’s notice that the purpose of your Andhra movement is to merge the Andhra districts of Madras and the Andhra districts of Nizam’s dominion.”

 

Despite Nizam’s overt concerns about the use of the term Andhra, Telugus refused to rename their organization to Telangana Mahasabha or Telugu Mahasabha.

 

I go into a greater detail about Nizam Andhra Mahasabha’s heroic fight against Nizam in my book. But, here’s the gist- Nizam Andhra Mahasabha went on to become a formidable organization that became Nizam’s worst nightmare. It shook up the foundation of the Hyderabad state. In the violent struggle against the Razakars, thousands of Nizam Andhra Mahasabha leaders gave up their lives.

 

So, where did this current antagonism for the term “Andhra” come from?

 

In 1953, Nehru described Telugus desire to merge into one state as “expansionist imperialism”. Taking advantage of Nehru’s disinclination for a unified state, leaders like Dr. Marri Chenna Reddy, who till then were in favor of an integrated state, demanded a separate Telangana state. However, there was an overwhelming desire across all the Telugu regions for Vishalandhra. As a result, Nehru held extensive negotiations with the leaders of all the regions and conceded to the formation of a united Telugu state.

 

Telugu’s dream for Vishalandhra became a reality with the signing of the Gentlemen’s Agreement. One of the sticking points during the negotiations was the name of the state. Leaders from Kosta and Rayalaseema wanted to name the state Andhra Pradesh, while some of the leaders from Nizam Telangana wanted to name it Andhra-Telangana. In the end agreement was reached to name the state Andhra Pradesh.

 

So, that is the origin for today’s claims about Kosta conspiracy to name the state Andhra Pradesh. However, the undeniable fact is that Telugu people scattered across Tamil, Kannada, Maratha, and Oriya regions have always identified themselves as Andhras.

 

There is no conspiracy behind calling ourselves Andhras. We all are Andhras, we all are Telingis, and we all are Telugus. The new definition of Andhra to represent Kosta and the new definition of Telangana to represent nine districts of Nizam Telangana is a fabrication of politicians intending to create a wedge between the Telugu tribe.

 

The same breed of separatist politicians is continuing to harvest hatred among Telugus after more than five decades since our state came into existence. Sadly, my Telugu brethren are continuing to fall for the separatists’ antics.

 

Save Andhra Pradesh!

 

Nalamotu Chakravarthy

http://www.myteluguroots.com

http://www.facebook.com/people/@/226703252445

http://twitter.com/nalamotu

http://www.amazon.com/My-Telugu-Roots-Telangana-Bhasmasura/dp/0984238603/